SPONSORED:

Trump lunches with two of his biggest Senate GOP critics

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rages against '60 Minutes' for interview with Krebs Cornyn spox: Neera Tanden has 'no chance' of being confirmed as Biden's OMB pick Pa. lawmaker was informed of positive coronavirus test while meeting with Trump: report MORE invited two of his biggest Senate Republican critics, Sens. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyVoters elected a record number of Black women to Congress this year — none were Republican Congress set for chaotic year-end sprint Biden's Cabinet a battleground for future GOP White House hopefuls MORE (Utah) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCongress set for chaotic year-end sprint Biden's Cabinet a battleground for future GOP White House hopefuls Two more parting shots from Trump aimed squarely at disabled workers MORE (Maine), to the White House on Thursday for an unspecified discussion.

The invitation comes as impeachment hearings in the House continue. The House is widely expected to impeach Trump, which would create a trial in the Senate where Romney and Collins would be two of the most scrutinized GOP votes.

Romney said before the meeting that he planned to talk about his own bill, the Trust Act, and the president’s plan for regulating vaping products.

ADVERTISEMENT

“If I’m asked for questions I want to talk to him about my Trust Act and get his perspectives on that. Vaping as well, I’d like to talk to him about his vaping plans,” Romney said.

The other Senate attendees at Thursday’s lunch were Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyColorado governor, spouse test positive for COVID-19 McConnell halts in-person Republican lunches amid COVID-19 surge Rep. Rick Allen tests positive for COVID-19 MORE (R-Iowa), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoAs Biden administration ramps up, Trump legal effort drags on The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump holds his last turkey pardon ceremony The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience MORE (R-W.Va.), James LankfordJames Paul LankfordEthics experts ask Senate to investigate Graham's probe of mail-in voting The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Capital One - Pfizer unveils detailed analysis of COVID-19 vaccine & next steps GOP senators congratulate Harris on Senate floor MORE (R-Okla.), John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Barrasso to seek top spot on Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Forest Service finalizes rule weakening environmental review of its projects | Biden to enlist Agriculture, Transportation agencies in climate fight Meadows meets with Senate GOP to discuss end-of-year priorities Senate advances energy regulator nominees despite uncertainty of floor vote MORE (R-N.D.) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulCongress set for chaotic year-end sprint McConnell halts in-person Republican lunches amid COVID-19 surge Biden's Cabinet a battleground for future GOP White House hopefuls MORE (R-Ky.).

Thursday’s event was the latest in a series of lunches that Trump has held with Republican senators.

Last week, he previewed for a small group of senators the transcript from his April 21 phone call congratulating Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on his election.

Some Republican senators have used these meetings as a chance to give the president advice, such as Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanBiden says transition outreach from Trump administration has been 'sincere' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump holds his last turkey pardon ceremony The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience MORE (Ohio), who in a recent lunch session urged the president to not let himself become too personally consumed by impeachment and let his Republican allies on Capitol Hill take up more of the burden of defense.

ADVERTISEMENT

Grassley on Thursday said he had no agenda for the meeting.

“I’m going to see how the meeting goes. If they have an agenda, we’ll have to stick to their agenda,” he said. 

Brett Samuels contributed.