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Graham requests State Department documents on Bidens, Ukraine

 
Graham sent a letter to Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoUS Olympic Committee urges Congress not to boycott Games in China Pompeo on CIA recruitment: We can't risk national security to appease 'liberal, woke agenda' DNC gathers opposition research on over 20 potential GOP presidential candidates MORE requesting the documents "to assist in answering questions regarding allegations that Vice President [Joe] Biden played a role in the termination of Prosecutor General [Viktor] Shokin in an effort to end the investigation of the company employing his son." 
 
Under Graham's request, he wants the State Department to hand over any documents tied to calls between the former vice president and former Ukraine President Petro Poroshenko, including if Biden brought up an investigation into Burisma, the company where his son, Hunter Biden, was on the board. 
 
 
Graham's request comes as he, President TrumpDonald TrumpProject Veritas surveilled government officials to expose anti-Trump sentiments: report Cheney: Fox News has 'a particular obligation' to refute election fraud claims The Memo: What now for anti-Trump Republicans? MORE and other GOP lawmakers have homed in on Hunter Biden as they've sought to push back against the House impeachment inquiry, which is investigating the president's actions toward Ukraine. 
 
Hunter Biden worked on the board of Burisma, a natural gas company owned by a Ukrainian oligarch, while his father served as vice president.
 
 
There’s no evidence that Joe Biden was acting with his son’s interests in mind and the former vice president has denied doing so.
 
A bipartisan group of senators, in a publicly released letter in 2016, urged Poroshenko to make "urgent reforms" to the prosecutor general's office. Kurt VolkerKurt VolkerGOP senators request details on Hunter Biden's travel for probe Yovanovitch retires from State Department: reports Live coverage: Senators enter second day of questions in impeachment trial MORE, the former U.S. envoy to Ukraine, also told House lawmakers last month during his closed-door deposition as part of the impeachment inquiry that Biden "was representing U.5. policy at the time."

"And it was a general assumption, I was not doing U.5. policy at the time, but a general assumption among the European Union, France, Germany, American diplomats, U.K., that Shokin was not doing his job as a prosecutor general. He was not pursuing corruption cases," Volker told lawmakers. 
 
Graham has faced pressure from the right to use the Judiciary Committee to investigate the Bidens.
 
After inviting Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiGiuliani hires attorneys who defended Harvey Weinstein The FBI should turn off the FARA faucet Michael Cohen on Giuliani's legal fees: He won't get 'two cents' from Trump MORE, Trump's personal lawyer, to testify, he appeared to reverse course, saying that the Foreign Relations Committee should instead call State Department officials to testify on the Bidens and Ukraine. 
 
Graham's letter to Pompeo was sent on Judiciary Committee letterhead, suggesting that he's reversed course a second time by seeking to have his panel look into the requested documents. 
 
Sens. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonImmigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart GOP split on counteroffer to Biden's spending Rand Paul clashes with Fauci over coronavirus origins MORE (R-Wis.) and Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyOn The Money: Biden says workers can't turn down job and get benefits | Treasury launches state and local aid | Businesses jump into vax push Grassley criticizes Biden's proposal to provide IRS with B The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Infrastructure, Cheney ouster on deck as Congress returns MORE (R-Iowa) — the chairmen of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and Finance committees, respectively — previously sent a letter to Pompeo seeking any documents tied to Hunter Biden and the Ukraine energy company.