Warren bill would revoke Medals of Honor for Wounded Knee massacre

Warren bill would revoke Medals of Honor for Wounded Knee massacre
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Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBiden: 'I'd add' Warren to my list of potential VP picks Warren says she made almost M from legal work over past three decades How can top Democrats run the economy with no business skill? MORE (D-Mass.) announced legislation Wednesday that would revoke 20 Medals of Honor that were awarded to soldiers who participated in the 1890 Wounded Knee massacre.

Warren and Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyMcConnell says he's 'honored' to be WholeFoods Magazine's 2019 'Person of the Year' Overnight Energy: Protesters plan Black Friday climate strike | 'Father of EPA' dies | Democrats push EPA to abandon methane rollback Warren bill would revoke Medals of Honor for Wounded Knee massacre MORE (D-Ore.) said they will introduce the Senate companion to the Remove the Stain Act. Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSunday shows — Nadler: A jury would convict Trump in 'three minutes flat' Booker on Harris dropping out: 'Iowa voters should have the right to choose' Booker campaign rakes in million after Harris exits 2020 race MORE (D-Calif.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson – House progressives may try to block vote on Pelosi drug bill | McConnell, Grassley at odds over Trump-backed drug pricing bill | Lawmakers close to deal on surprise medical bills Congressional leaders unite to fight for better future for America's children and families McConnell, Grassley at odds over Trump-backed drug bill MORE (D-Ore.), Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyTrump brings pardoned soldiers on stage at Florida fundraiser: report ICE emerges as stumbling block in government funding talks Republicans raise concerns over Trump pardoning service members MORE (D-Vt.), and Bernie SandersBernie SandersHow can top Democrats run the economy with no business skill? Biden rallies with John Kerry in early primary states Buttigieg campaign says 2000 people attended Iowa rally MORE (I-Vt.) are original co-sponsors of the bill. Harris and Sanders, like Warren, are 2020 Democratic presidential contenders.

The legislation was first introduced in the House by Reps. Denny HeckDennis (Denny) Lynn HeckExclusive: Guccifer 2.0 hacked memos expand on Pennsylvania House races Heck enjoys second political wind Incoming lawmaker feeling a bit overwhelmed MORE (D-Wash.), Paul CookPaul Joseph CookWarren bill would revoke Medals of Honor for Wounded Knee massacre Amazon poised to escalate Pentagon 'war cloud' fight The Hill's Morning Report - Trump eyes narrowly focused response to Iran attacks MORE (R-Calif.) and Deb HaalandDebra HaalandWarren bill would revoke Medals of Honor for Wounded Knee massacre Warren adds Ayanna Pressley as campaign co-chair Progressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising MORE (D-N.M.), one of the two Native American women in Congress.

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The massacre took place in 1890 on the Lakota Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota when Army soldiers slaughtered several hundred Lakota Indians, mostly women and children. The Medal of Honor, the country’s highest military honor, is awarded by Congress for “gallantry beyond the call of duty.”

“The horrifying acts of violence against hundreds of Lakota men, women, and children at Wounded Knee should be condemned, not celebrated with Medals of Honor,” Warren said in a statement. “The Remove the Stain Act acknowledges a profoundly shameful event in U.S. history, and that’s why I’m joining my House colleagues in this effort to advance justice and take a step toward righting wrongs against Native peoples.”

“We have a responsibility to tell the true story of the horrific Wounded Knee Massacre,” added Merkley. “We cannot whitewash or minimize the dark chapters of our history, but instead must remember, reflect on, and work to rectify them. The massacre of innocents could not be farther from heroism, and I hope this bill helps set the record straight.”

Congress passed legislation in 1990 formally apologizing for the massacre, but further action was never taken.

The Remove the Stain Act, which comes after a campaign by indigenous groups for Congress to pass such legislation, has garnered the support of several tribes.

“As President of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, and on behalf of the people of the Oglala band of Lakota, I want to thank Senator Warren and Senator Merkley for bringing the Remove the Stain Act to the Senate,” said Oglala Sioux Tribe President Julian Bear Runner. “Our Lakota people have suffered a tremendous loss of hundreds of our relatives at the Wounded Knee Massacre and although Congress apologized for this atrocity in 1990, an apology is meaningless without justice and Senators Warren and Merkley’s bill provides some justice to our people.”