McConnell: Senate trial should not include witnesses

Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell in talks with Mnuchin on next phase of coronavirus relief Pelosi: 'We shouldn't even be thinking' about reopening schools without federal aid The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Argentum - All eyes on Florida as daily COVID-19 cases hit 15K MORE (R-Ky.) said on Tuesday that the looming Senate impeachment trial should not include witnesses, pushing back on a request by his Democratic counterpart in the upper chamber.

McConnell, during a radio interview with The Brian Kilmeade Show, warned that calling witnesses as part of the trial would pave the way for a "kind of mutual assured distraction," because both sides might try to call witnesses considered anathema to the other party.

"I think we've heard enough. After we've heard the arguments, we ought to vote and move on," McConnell said.

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McConnell also sent a warning shot to Democrats, predicting that if they try call witnesses Republicans would "want the whistleblower; we're going to want Hunter Biden."

At the heart of the impeachment inquiry is President TrumpDonald John TrumpWayfair refutes QAnon-like conspiracy theory that it's trafficking children Stone rails against US justice system in first TV interview since Trump commuted his sentence Federal appeals court rules Trump admin can't withhold federal grants from California sanctuary cities MORE's conduct towards Ukraine, including pressing for investigations into a Ukrainian energy company that employed Hunter Biden, the son of former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Runoff elections in Texas, Alabama set for Tuesday Biden campaign slams White House attacks on Fauci as 'disgusting' Biden lets Trump be Trump MORE, Trump's political rival.

"You can see here that this would be a kind of mutual assured destruction episode, that would go on for a long time. ... The president's not going to be removed from office. The only issue is how long do we want to take to get the final decision. I think that we've heard enough. we're going to listen to arguments, but my view is it's time to vote and move on," McConnell added.

McConnell's radio interview comes as he went to the Senate floor on Tuesday and rejected Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerWells Fargo told employees to delete TikTok from work phones Democrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' A renewed emphasis on research and development funding is needed from the government MORE's (D-N.Y.) initial proposal on rules for the trial.

Democrats asked to call four witnesses, including acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyTrump's former chief of staff hits coronavirus efforts: 'We still have a testing problem' Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Chris Christie Trump admin lifts ban on sales of silencers to private foreign buyers MORE and former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonJudge lifts restraining order on Mary Trump on eve of book's release The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Argentum - All eyes on Florida as daily COVID-19 cases hit 15K Juan Williams: Trump's silence on Russian bounties betrays America MORE, and want one resolution that would cover both the trial process and specific witnesses.

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McConnell stopped short, during his floor speech, of specifically saying he did not want further witnesses, but indicated that the decision should be made later.

"The basic procedural framework of the Clinton impeachment trial served the Senate and the nation well, in my view," McConnell said during his floor speech. "I still believe the Senate should try to follow the 1999 model."

During former President Clinton's impeachment trial, senators voted 100-0 on a resolution laying out the process for a trial, but a vote on a subsequent resolution calling for specific witnesses broke down along party lines.