Whistleblower's lawyer questions GOP senator's whistleblower protection caucus membership

A lawyer representing the whistleblower, whose complaint filed to Congress was the impetus for the impeachment inquiry, questioned why Sen. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnDemocrats smell blood with new DHS whistleblower complaint Hillicon Valley: Election officials prepare for new Russian interference battle | 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy | GOP senators unveil bill to update tech liability protections GOP senators unveil new bill to update tech liability protections MORE (R-Tenn.) remains a member of the whistleblower protection caucus following a November comment about his client who brought attention to President TrumpDonald John TrumpUS reimposes UN sanctions on Iran amid increasing tensions Jeff Flake: Republicans 'should hold the same position' on SCOTUS vacancy as 2016 Trump supporters chant 'Fill that seat' at North Carolina rally MORE's dealings with Ukraine. 

"Sen #Whistleblower Protection Caucus was launched by bipartisan group in 2015 to raise awareness of need for adequate protections against retaliation for govt employees who call attention to wrongdoing," attorney Mark Zaid tweeted on Thursday. 

"Why is Sen @MarshaBlackburn still member given her hostility towards #WBers?" he added. 

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Zaid particularly referred to a Nov. 22 tweet by Blackburn in which she referred to impeachment witness Lt. Col. Alexander VindmanAlexander VindmanImpeachment witness Alexander Vindman calls Trump Putin's 'useful idiot' The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Trump, Biden renew push for Latino support Strzok: Trump behaving like an authoritarian MORE as the "whistleblower's handler."

Many Republicans criticized the anonymous whistleblower, whose complaint eventually led to the impeachment inquiry into Trump and called on the person to testify. 

In 2015, a group of bipartisan Senators launched the Whistleblower Protection Caucus to "foster bipartisan discussion on legislative issues affecting the treatment of whistleblowers and serve as a clearinghouse for current information on whistleblower developments of interest."

Blackburn became a member of the group this year.