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Law professor writes Kentucky newspaper op-ed accusing McConnell of breaking two oaths

A Kentucky-born law professor went after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell says 'no concerns' after questions about health Overnight Health Care: Trump says he hopes Supreme Court strikes down ObamaCare | FDA approves remdesivir as COVID-19 treatment | Dems threaten to subpoena HHS over allegations of political interference at CDC The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump, Biden face off for last time on the debate stage MORE (R-Ky.) in an op-ed Friday, saying that the senator broke two of the three oaths in the U.S. Constitution.

The Boston College law professor, Kent Greenfield, criticized McConnell's comments about an impeachment trial for President TrumpDonald John TrumpMore than 300 military family members endorse Biden Five takeaways from the final Trump-Biden debate Biden: 'I would transition from the oil industry' MORE

"We Kentuckians know that our word is our bond. Oaths are the most solemn of promises, and their breach results in serious reputational — and sometimes legal — consequences," Greenfield wrote in his op-ed published by the Courier Journal.

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"President Donald Trump will soon be on trial in the Senate on grounds that he breached one oath," Greenfield wrote. "Senate Leader Mitch McConnell is about to breach two."

The first oath McConnell is breaking, Greenfield states, is the oath that he took when took office. It's an oath that all state and federal officers take, an “Oath … to support this Constitution.”

The second oath pertains to the impeachment trial that will take place sometime after the new year.

"In Article I, the Constitution gives the Senate the 'sole' power to 'try all impeachments,' and the Constitution requires that 'when sitting for that Purpose, they shall be on Oath or Affirmation,' " Greenfield wrote.

Continuing, he wrote: "The framers wanted to make sure the Senate would never take such a trial lightly — this oath requirement is over and above the oath each senator has already taken to support the Constitution."

McConnell has openly said that he plans to coordinate with Trump's defense team and that he doesn't view himself as an "impartial juror."

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Greenfield, a sixth-generation Kentuckian, targeted those comments in his op-ed.

"McConnell’s loyalty to Trump should not overwhelm his loyalty to the Constitution," he asserts. "If he fails in this, he is not only violating his Article I oath but his Article VI oath."

Greenfield concludes his piece by stating that history will be a "harsh judge," and urges the longtime Kentucky senator to take his "obligation of faithful impartiality seriously."