GOP senator plans to seek dismissal of impeachment articles

Sen. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyBiden calls for revoking key online legal protection House poised to hand impeachment articles to Senate Pelosi set to send impeachment articles to the Senate next week MORE (R-Mo.) will try to dismiss the articles of impeachment against President TrumpDonald John TrumpNational Archives says it altered Trump signs, other messages in Women's March photo Dems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Democratic lawmaker dismisses GOP lawsuit threat: 'Take your letter and shove it' MORE that House Democrats have delayed sending to the Senate. 

Hawley, in a pair of tweets, argued that normally "if prosecution doesn’t proceed with case, it gets dismissed."

"So on Monday, I will introduce measure to dismiss this bogus impeachment for lack of prosecution," he tweeted. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Officials for the GOP senator didn't immediately respond to questions about his plan. 

The House last month passed two articles of impeachment — one on the president abusing his power in his dealings with Ukraine and another on him obstructing Congress during its investigation of those actions — making Trump the third president in U.S. history to be impeached.

ADVERTISEMENT

But Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiRepublicans will pay on Election Day for politicizing Trump's impeachment Trump chooses high-profile but controversial legal team Trump: Impeachment timing intended to hurt Sanders MORE (D-Calif.) has declined to say when she will transmit the articles to the Senate, an action that would kick off the impeachment trial. 

Pelosi said she wants to know the details of the trial proceedings. The move appears to have rankled Trump, who has repeatedly lashed out over the decision. 

Hawley's pledge to try to dismiss the impeachment effort comes after Trump tweeted a quote this week from Fox News arguing for the articles to be dismissed. 

But Senate Republicans have also signaled that they want to acquit Trump fully, not merely dismiss the articles. Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Senate GOP mulls speeding up Trump impeachment trial Republicans will pay on Election Day for politicizing Trump's impeachment MORE (R-Ky.) has also previously shot down the idea of dismissing the articles, saying the Senate will have a trial. 

"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell said in November.

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntSenate GOP mulls speeding up Trump impeachment trial Biden calls for revoking key online legal protection GOP threatens to weaponize impeachment witnesses amid standoff MORE (Mo.), the No. 4 Republican in the chamber, told reporters shortly before the recess that he did not anticipate a motion to dismiss. Meanwhile, Sen. John CornynJohn CornynHillicon Valley: Biden calls for revoking tech legal shield | DHS chief 'fully expects' Russia to try to interfere in 2020 | Smaller companies testify against Big Tech 'monopoly power' Bipartisan group of senators introduces legislation to boost state cybersecurity leadership Koch network could target almost 200 races in 2020, official says MORE (R-Texas), an adviser to McConnell, said in November that he did not think Republicans would get the 51 votes to dismiss the articles. 

“There’s some people talking about trying to stop the bill, dismiss charges basically as soon as they get over here. I think that’s not going to happen. That would require 51 votes,” he said.