Activist group requests ethics probe of Graham's impeachment comments

Left-leaning activist group American Democracy Legal Fund (ADLF) has asked the Senate Ethics Committee to launch an inquiry into Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSunday shows preview: Lawmakers gear up for Senate impeachment trial Parnas pressure grows on Senate GOP Senate GOP mulls speeding up Trump impeachment trial MORE’s (R-S.C.) remarks about President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump's newest Russia adviser, Andrew Peek, leaves post: report Hawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss Trump rips New York City sea wall: 'Costly, foolish' and 'environmentally unfriendly idea' MORE's looming impeachment trial.

In a Dec. 17 letter to the committee that was made public Monday, the group cited Graham’s public comments that he has “made up” his mind and that he is “not trying to pretend to be a fair juror here.”

Graham has made similar comments to reporters throughout the impeachment process.

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“In Senator Graham’s own words -- he is not even going to pretend to follow his constitutionally required oath of impartiality,” ADLF President Brad Woodhouse wrote in the letter. “This statement not only indicates Senator Graham’s clear intention to violate a sworn oath, but further calls into question the integrity of any impeachment trial that is held in the U.S. Senate.”

A spokesperson for Graham’s office declined to comment, and a spokesperson for the Senate Ethics Committee was not immediately available for comment.

“Senator Graham is clearly incapable of following Senate rules or complying with his ethical duties as a member of the U.S. Senate,” Woodhouse said in a statement to The Hill. “We are therefore demanding a thorough investigation into his misconduct by the Senate Ethics Committee.”

Democrats have criticized Graham for his comments, accusing him of violating the oath senators will take ahead of the impeachment trial. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss Democrats file brief against Trump, 'the Framers' worst nightmare' Iran resolution supporters fear impeachment will put it on back burner MORE (R-Ky.) has also been criticized for his remarks that he will work in “total coordination” with the White House throughout the process.

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRepublicans will pay on Election Day for politicizing Trump's impeachment GOP threatens to weaponize impeachment witnesses amid standoff Paul predicts no Republicans will vote to convict Trump MORE (R-Alaska) joined Democrats in condemning McConnell’s comments, telling local Alaska NBC-affiliate KTUU last month she was “disturbed” by his remarks.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiREAD: House impeachment managers' trial brief Desperate Democrats badmouth economy even as it booms Pelosi offers message to Trump on Bill Maher show: 'You are impeached forever' MORE (D-Calif.) has not sent the two House-passed articles of impeachment to the Senate over concerns about the parameters and fairness of an impeachment trial in the GOP-controlled upper chamber.

McConnell has signaled he is not willing to meet Democrats’ demands that top White House officials testify as part of the impeachment trial. Former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonDemocrats file brief against Trump, 'the Framers' worst nightmare' Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers gear up for Senate impeachment trial Pelosi offers message to Trump on Bill Maher show: 'You are impeached forever' MORE threw a curveball into the impeachment process Monday when he announced that he would be willing to testify in the Senate trial if subpoenaed.