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Senators introduce resolution warning that Congress has not authorized Iran war

Senators on Wednesday introduced a resolution stressing that neither the 2001 nor 2002 authorization for the use of military force (AUMF) covers a potential war with Iran. 

The resolution, spearheaded by Sens. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleySchumer vows to only pass infrastructure package that is 'a strong, bold climate bill' Joe Manchin keeps Democrats guessing on sweeping election bill Tensions grow between liberals and centrists on infrastructure MORE (D-Ore.) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior Rand Paul does not support a national minimum wage increase — and it's important to understand why Fauci to Chelsea Clinton: The 'phenomenal amount of hostility' I face is 'astounding' MORE (R-Ky.), comes after days of escalating tensions between Washington and Tehran in the wake of a U.S. airstrike that killed Qassem Soleimani, Iran's top military general.

“The American people do not want another endless war in the Middle East — yet what we’ve seen in recent days is a president willing to make significant military decisions bringing us closer to war without consulting Congress or recognizing that our Constitution gives war making power to Congress, not the President,” Merkley said in a statement.

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Paul added that Congress could "take a major step toward reasserting our voice by making it clear" that neither of the George W. Bush-era war declarations cover a conflict with Iran.

"It is time for Congress to stop using previous AUMFs as an excuse to continue abdicating its constitutional responsibility on war," he said.  

Sens. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyHillicon Valley: Senate unanimously confirms Chris Inglis as first White House cyber czar | Scrutiny mounts on Microsoft's surveillance technology | Senators unveil bill to crack down on cyber criminals Biden signs Juneteenth bill: 'Great nations don't ignore their most painful moments' FCC votes to advance proposed ban on Chinese telecom equipment MORE (D-Mass.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Democratic senators press PhRMA over COVID-19 lobbying efforts  Schumer vows to only pass infrastructure package that is 'a strong, bold climate bill' MORE (D-Mass.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenFive takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision Schumer vows to only pass infrastructure package that is 'a strong, bold climate bill' Supreme Court upholds ObamaCare in 7-2 ruling MORE (D-Ore.), Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenZombie Tax punishes farmers to fill DC coffers Democrats face new pressure to raise taxes Democrats reintroduce bill to create 'millionaires surtax' MORE (D-Md.), and Bernie SandersBernie SandersOVERNIGHT ENERGY:  EPA announces new clean air advisors after firing Trump appointees |  Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior | Watchdog: Bureau of Land Management saw messaging failures, understaffing during pandemic Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 Democratic senators press PhRMA over COVID-19 lobbying efforts  MORE (I-Vt.) are co-sponsoring the resolution. 

The one-page resolution states that "neither the Authorization for Use of Military Force ... nor the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 ... may be interpreted as a statutory authorization for the use of military force against the Islamic Republic of Iran." 

The Trump administration has pointed to the 2002 AUMF as its legal authorization for the strike. 

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Senators say they decided to introduce the resolution after a closed-door briefing with top administration officials who, according to Democrats, did not present evidence that Soleimani was killed to prevent an "imminent" threat. 

Paul and Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC GOP senators press Justice Department to compare protest arrests to Capitol riot MORE (R-Utah) also railed against the briefing afterward because they say an official warned that publicly debating Trump's war authority "emboldened" Iran. 

"I find this insulting and demeaning ... to the office that each of the 100 senators in this building happens to hold. I find it insulting and demeaning to the Constitution of the United States," Lee said of the comment.