Third GOP senator says he'll support Iran war powers resolution

Sen. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungIran resolution supporters fear impeachment will put it on back burner Senate GOP's campaign arm hauls in million in 2019 Sens. Kaine, Lee: 'We should not be at war with Iran unless Congress authorizes it' MORE (R-Ind.) said on Tuesday that he will support a revised resolution that would rein in President TrumpDonald John TrumpRouhani says Iran will never seek nuclear weapons Trump downplays seriousness of injuries in Iran attack after US soldiers treated for concussions Trump says Bloomberg is 'wasting his money' on 2020 campaign MORE’s ability to take military action against Iran without congressional approval.

Young said that he was supportive of what he called “Kaine 2.0,” referring to a revised war powers resolution authored by Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineIran resolution supporters fear impeachment will put it on back burner House war powers sponsor expects to take up Senate version of resolution Sens. Kaine, Lee: 'We should not be at war with Iran unless Congress authorizes it' MORE (D-Va.).

“I will be supporting, shall we call it, Kaine 2.0., the newer Kaine language, should I have an opportunity to vote on it,” Young told reporters.

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In a procedural twist for Democrats, Young said in a separate statement that he would not support Kaine’s resolution on an initial vote to bring it up on the Senate floor.

“While I appreciate Senator Kaine’s willingness to revise this bill, I will be opposing the motion to discharge and hope that we can continue working on this issue in a less politicized manner,” Young said in the statement.

Young added that he has been working with Kaine, but “due to Senate parliamentarian procedures, those revisions will not be incorporated until after a partisan vote to discharge occurs.”

The resolution that would be discharged from the Foreign Relations Committee would be Kaine’s initial resolution, which does not include the changes he made to win over Republicans.

Kaine could then amend it on the floor to reflect changes asked for by Republicans before final passage.

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Young is the third Republican senator to say he will support the revised resolution. Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulCheney's decision not to run for Senate sparks Speaker chatter Juan Williams: Counting the votes to remove Trump Mitch McConnell may win the impeachment and lose the Senate MORE (R-Ky.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenators are politicians, not jurors — they should act like it Sens. Kaine, Lee: 'We should not be at war with Iran unless Congress authorizes it' Overnight Defense: War powers fight runs into impeachment | Kaine has 51 votes for Iran resolution | Trump plans to divert .2B from Pentagon to border wall MORE (R-Utah) have both said they will support it.

Democrats need four Republican senators to break with them to pass the resolution, which would require Trump to end hostilities against Iran within 30 days unless he gets Congress to sign off on them.

Several GOP senators, including Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clashes, concessions Senate Republicans muscle through rules for Trump trial Collins breaks with GOP on attempt to change impeachment rules resolution MORE (R-Maine) and Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranMcConnell keeps press in check as impeachment trial starts Overnight Defense: War powers fight runs into impeachment | Kaine has 51 votes for Iran resolution | Trump plans to divert .2B from Pentagon to border wall War powers fight in Senate runs squarely into impeachment MORE (R-Kan.), have not said how they would vote on the resolution.

Kaine has been making changes to his resolution as he’s tried to gather more Republican support. He removed two paragraphs in the "findings" section that directly mention Trump over concerns from Republicans and some Democrats that it was too political.

Kaine also said he was working in some of the language from a House-passed war powers resolution into his, specifically changing his wording about removing troops to the lower chamber's use of “termination of the use of U.S. armed forces” in hostilities against Iran after some colleagues raised concerns that “removing” suggested a pullback of U.S. troops from the region.

--This report was updated at 1:42 p.m.