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Democrats vow to force third vote on Trump's border wall emergency declaration

Democrats vow to force third vote on Trump's border wall emergency declaration
© Greg Nash

Senate Democrats on Wednesday are vowing to force a third vote aimed at ending President Trump's national emergency declaration amid reports that the White House is shifting more money from the Pentagon to the border wall.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerTrump expressed doubt to donors GOP can hold Senate: report Trump announces opening of relations between Sudan and Israel Five takeaways on Iran, Russia election interference MORE (D-N.Y.) as well as Sens. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahySchumer says he had 'serious talk' with Feinstein, declines to comment on Judiciary role Durbin says he will run for No. 2 spot if Dems win Senate majority Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein MORE (D-Vt.), Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedOvernight Defense: Armed Services chairman unsold on slashing defense budget | Democratic Senate report details 'damage, chaos' of Trump foreign policy | Administration approves .8B Taiwan arms sales Overnight Defense: Famed Navy SEAL calls Trump out | Yemen's Houthi rebels free two Americans | Marines fire commander after deadly training accident Trump slight against Gold Star families adds to military woes MORE (D-R.I.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSenators battle over Supreme Court nominee in rare Saturday session McConnell tees up Barrett nomination, setting up rare weekend session Bipartisan group of senators call on Trump to sanction Russia over Navalny poisoning MORE (D-Ill.) and Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Judge tosses land management plans after ousting Pendley from role | Trump says he could out-raise Biden with calls to Wall Street, oil execs | Supreme Court to review Trump border wall funding, asylum policies OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Pendley says court decision ousting him from BLM has had 'no impact' | Court strikes down Obama-era rule targeting methane leaks from public lands drilling | Feds sued over no longer allowing polluters to pay for environmental projects  Pendley says court decision ousting him from BLM has had 'no impact' MORE (D-N.M.) released a statement saying they "strongly oppose" Trump's decision, calling it a “continued cannibalization” of the Pentagon's accounts.

"We will continue to oppose the transfer of counterdrug funding for the wall, and will force yet another vote to terminate the President’s sham national emergency declaration and return these much-needed military construction funds back to our military," the Democrats said.

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The Washington Post reported that Trump will divert $3.5 billion from the Pentagon's counterdrug programs and $3.7 billion from military construction funding.

The decision sparked bipartisan backlash from lawmakers tasked with funding the government, with Republicans raising public questions about potential unintended consequences for the military.

Democrats added on Wednesday that the decision was a "slap in the face" to the military.

“Bipartisan majorities in Congress have repeatedly rejected diverting money from critical military construction projects to build a single additional mile of border wall. Robbing the Defense Department of these much-needed funds in order to boost his own ego and for a wall he promised Mexico would pay to build is an insult to the sacrifices made by our service members," they said.

Passing legislation to block Trump's emergency declaration requires a simple majority in the Senate, though supporters would need 67 votes to ultimately override Trump's veto.

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The Senate has previously voted twice to end the emergency declaration, with roughly a dozen GOP senators voting with Democrats to nix Trump's decision.

Under the National Emergencies Act, Democrats can force a vote on ending Trump’s emergency declaration every six months. The Senate voted in September and, for the first time, last February to end the emergency declaration.

Trump, however, vetoed both measures and Congress has been unable to override the veto.