Hawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss

Sen. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyExpanding tax credit for businesses retaining workers gains bipartisan support GOP deeply divided over Trump's social media crackdown Trump's social media executive order is a huge opportunity MORE (R-Mo.) told Axios Saturday that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFor city parks: Pass the Great American Outdoors Act now US ill-prepared for coronavirus-fueled mental health crisis Schumer to GOP: Cancel 'conspiracy hearings' on origins of Russia probe MORE (R-Ky.) is expected to present a resolution that will allow President TrumpDonald John TrumpDonald Trump and Joe Biden create different narratives for the election The hollowing out of the CDC Poll: Biden widens lead over Trump to 10 points MORE's legal counsel to motion to immediately dismiss the charges during the Senate impeachment trial that starts in earnest Tuesday.

"I am familiar with the resolution as it stood a day or two ago," Hawley told the news source.

"My understanding is that the resolution will give the president's team the option to either move to judgment or to move to dismiss at a meaningful time," the junior senator continued.

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Hawley also said that he would be "very, very surprised" if the final resolution didn't give Trump's lawyers that ability and that he might not vote for it.

Earlier this week, McConnell told reporters that "there is little or no sentiment in the Republican conference for a motion to dismiss. Our members feel that we have an obligation to listen to the arguments."

Regardless, Trump's defense team has signaled that it wants a quick Senate trial. According to Axios, GOP lawmakers have prepared for a time frame as short as two weeks.

On Saturday, Trump's legal team went after the articles of impeachment that were passed by the House in a statement, calling them "constitutionally invalid."

“This is a brazen and unlawful attempt to overturn the results of the 2016 election and interfere with the 2020 election — now just months away,” the statement continued. 

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Trump's legal team is headed by White House counsel Pat Cipollone and Jay Sekulow, Trump's personal attorney. Rounding out the team are Harvard Law professor Alan DershowitzAlan Morton DershowitzMoussaoui says he now renounces terrorism, bin Laden The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Frist says Manhattan Project-like initiative necessary to fight virus; WH to release plan for easing lockdowns The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden faces tough task of uniting Democrats MORE, Kenneth Starr, Robert Ray, Jane Raskin and Pam Bondi.

Also on Saturday, House Democrats filed a 111-page brief outlining their reasons for impeachment.

"The evidence overwhelmingly establishes that he is guilty of both [articles of impeachment]," the brief reads.

"The only remaining question is whether the members of the Senate will accept and carry out the responsibility placed on them by the Framers of our Constitution and their constitutional Oaths," it adds.