Clinton: McConnell's rules like 'head juror colluding with the defendant to cover up a crime'

Clinton: McConnell's rules like 'head juror colluding with the defendant to cover up a crime'
© Greg Nash

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonRussian interference reports rock Capitol Hill Judge dismisses Nunes' lawsuit against Fusion GPS The Hill's Campaign Report: What to watch for in Nevada MORE blasted Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellWhere do we go from here? Conservation can show the way Russian interference reports rock Capitol Hill Top GOP super PAC spent money on NC Democrat MORE (R-Ky) on Tuesday over his proposed rules for President TrumpDonald John TrumpWhere do we go from here? Conservation can show the way Gov. Ron DeSantis more popular in Florida than Trump Sotomayor accuses Supreme Court of bias in favor of Trump administration MORE's impeachment trial in the upper chamber, saying they are like the “head juror colluding with the defendant.”

“The rules Sen. McConnell has proposed for the president's impeachment trial are the equivalent of a head juror colluding with the defendant to cover up a crime,” she posted on Twitter. 

The former secretary of State and Democratic presidential nominee called on her followers to contact their senators and demand they allow witnesses and evidence in the Senate trial and not participate in a "cover-up.”

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Late Monday, McConnell revealed the rules, which provide House managers and Trump’s legal team with the same amount of time to make legal arguments as each side got in President Clinton's impeachment trial, but squeezes the arguments into fewer days. 

House evidence from the inquiry would also not be immediately included in the Senate record. 

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McConnell has maintained that the trial should not include additional witnesses and evidence beyond what the House unveiled in its inquiry. He has also said he has enough votes to pass the trial rules.

But Democrats argue that all of the necessary information should be utilized when making a decision about removing Trump from office. They say the Senate should attempt to obtain information previously withheld by the White House, including testimony from former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonTrump directly sought to block publication of Bolton's book: WaPo 'Parasite' studio fires back after Trump criticism: 'He can't read' Trump swipes at 'little wise guy' Brad Pitt, Korean film 'Parasite' during rally MORE.

Lawmakers on the left criticized McConnell's rules when they were published, with Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerRussian interference reports rock Capitol Hill Clinton calls Trump 'Putin's puppet' amid reports of Russian interference in 2020 election New York man accused of making death threats against Schumer, Schiff MORE (D-N.Y.) calling them a "disgrace."