George Conway says Senate GOP knows Trump is 'guilty': 'What are they afraid of?'

George ConwayGeorge Thomas ConwayFormer Romney strategist joins anti-Trump Lincoln Project George Conway group lines up body bags in ad hitting Trump on coronavirus deaths Overnight Defense: Trump to withdraw US from Open Skies Treaty | Pentagon drops ban on recruits who had virus | FBI says Corpus Christi shooting terror-related MORE, a conservative lawyer and husband to White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayFormer Romney strategist joins anti-Trump Lincoln Project Kellyanne Conway on voting by mail in 2018 midterms: 'That's called an absentee ballot' Kellyanne Conway: Trump's Twitter fact checks done by 'people who attack him all day long' MORE, on Wednesday denounced Senate Republicans for blocking new witnesses and documents from the opening stage of the impeachment trial, claiming that the GOP didn't want to see additional evidence because they know President TrumpDonald John TrumpMinneapolis erupts for third night, as protests spread, Trump vows retaliation Stocks open mixed ahead of Trump briefing on China The island that can save America MORE is "guilty."

“What are they afraid of?" George Conway, an outspoken Trump critic, said while making an appearance on CNN. "They're going to hear evidence they won’t like? That's the thing that I find most disturbing about it, is they don't want to hear the evidence because they know the truth. They know he's guilty. And they don’t want to hear the evidence because they don’t want the American public to see it too."

Conway's comments followed a day in which Senate Republicans tabled several Democratic amendments that would have compelled the White House to turn over documents related to delayed Ukrainian military aid. The Senate passed an organizing resolution that stipulates that new witnesses and documents will be considered after opening arguments and a 16-hour question and answer period for senators. 

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation COVID-19 workplace complaints surge; unions rip administration Senate Democrats pump brakes on new stimulus checks MORE (R-Ky.) contended that all the documents and witness requests that Democrats put forward "could be dealt with at the appropriate time." But Democrats have raised fears that the upper chamber could take part in a "cover-up" by denying evidence. 

They have specifically called for former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonHave the courage to recognize Taiwan McConnell says Obama administration 'did leave behind' pandemic plan Trump company lawyer warned Michael Cohen not to write 'tell-all' book: report MORE and acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick Mulvaney12 things to know today about coronavirus Mulvaney: 'We've overreacted a little bit' to coronavirus The Memo: Trump agenda rolls on amid pandemic MORE to testify in the trial. 

Conway said the trial would serve as a moment of "reckoning" for the Republican Party. 

"This is a moment of reckoning, not just for the country and for the rule of law and the Constitution, it’s a very specific day of reckoning for the Republican senators and the Republican Party in general," he said. “Are they going to stand for lies instead of truth? Are they going to stand for gaslighting instead of reality? Are they going to do the bidding of this one man? That’s what this is about."

The House in December voted to impeach Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress following an inquiry into his alleged dealings with Ukraine. Trump is accused of using nearly $400 million in military aid and a White House meeting as leverage in his push for Ukraine to announce investigations of his political rivals. 

Conway, who is now serving as an adviser to The Lincoln Project, an anti-Trump super PAC, wrote in December that Trump's "boundlessly self-centered bent” made it “inevitable” that he would be impeached.