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Schiff sparks blowback with head on a 'pike' line

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Lone wolf actors post greatest domestic terror threat, FBI, DHS conclude State calls for Azerbaijan to pull back forces from Armenia border MORE (D-Calif.) is sparking immediate, bipartisan backlash after he referenced a CBS News report saying Republican senator heads will be on a 'pike' if they break with President TrumpDonald TrumpSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Navajo Nation president on Arizona's new voting restrictions: An 'assault' on our rights The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez MORE on the impeachment fight. 
 
Schiff referenced the report as he was in the final stretch of his closing argument on the Senate floor on Friday night. 
 
"CBS News report that a Trump confidant said that GOP senators were warned '... vote against the president and your head will be on a pike,'" Schiff said from the Senate floor. 
 
Schiff had managed to win some smiles from Republicans, including Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamPro-Trump lawyer Lin Wood causes headache for GOP in key S.C. race GOP governors move to cut unemployment benefits as debate rages over effects Trump critics push new direction for GOP MORE (R-S.C.), during his closing statement but the moment drew immediate blowback from Republicans, both from allies of the president and more centrist GOP senators seen as swing votes. 
 
 
"That's not true," she said several times from her seat, loudly enough to be overheard from the Senate gallery.
 
Collins said in a subsequent statement that “not only have I never heard the ‘head on the pike’ line, but also I know of no Republican Senator who has been threatened in any way by anyone in the Administration.”
 
 
"That's where he lost me," Murkowski told reporters after the trial wrapped, adding that Schiff "overreached." 
 
Schiff continued to reference the CBS News report, despite the audible reaction from Republicans, adding "I don't know if that's true, but when I read that I was struck by the irony, by the irony."
 
 
Amid the verbal pushback, Schiff paused mid-sentence and turned toward the Republican side of the room, adding, "I hope it's not true. I hope it's not true."
 
The slight caveat wasn't enough to quell the Republican furor. 
 
Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordTop border officials defend Biden policies Rubio and bipartisan group of senators push to make daylight saving time permanent Senate inches toward COVID-19 vote after marathon session MORE (R-Okla.) said the remark was "one of the most remarkable moments." 

"That is completely totally false, and all of us were shaking our heads 'like where did that story come from' and Adam Schiff just kept saying it," he said.

Lankford that "the whole room was visibly upset on our side of it. ...That's insulting and demeaning." 
 
Several Republican senators, including Sens. Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesGOP senator urges Biden to withdraw support for COVID vaccine patent waiver Overnight Energy: 5 takeaways from the Colonial Pipeline attack | Colonial aims to 'substantially' restore pipeline operations by end of week | Three questions about Biden's conservation goals House conservatives take aim at Schumer-led bipartisan China bill MORE (R-Mont.) and Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Overnight Defense: Capitol security bill includes 1M to reimburse National Guard | Turner to lead House push against military sexual assault | Pentagon drops mask mandate GOP Rep. Turner to lead House push to address military sexual assault MORE (R-Iowa), could be seen visibly shaking their heads over Schiff's remarks. 
 
Barrasso, speaking to reporters after the trial ended, vehemently denied that the threat from Trump ever happened. 

"He has basically offended every Republican senator in there tonight," Barrasso told reporters. 
 
 
Some Democrats also distanced themselves from the House Intelligence Committee chairman. 
 
 
"I don't know why people do that," Manchin added. "That could have been left out that's for sure." 
 
 
"That was the only time I heard a loud audible reaction from the Republican side. ...We know the president attacks people that work for him," Brown sad. "We know that there is fear of him throughout the Republican caucus." 
 
Scott Wong contributed
 
Updated: 11:26 p.m.