Schiff sparks blowback with head on a 'pike' line

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffFlynn urged Russian diplomat to have 'reciprocal' response to Obama sanctions, new transcripts show The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order targeting social media legal protections | House requests conference with Senate after FISA vote canceled | Minneapolis systems temporarily brought down by hackers MORE (D-Calif.) is sparking immediate, bipartisan backlash after he referenced a CBS News report saying Republican senator heads will be on a 'pike' if they break with President TrumpDonald John TrumpFauci says his meetings with Trump have 'dramatically decreased' McEnany criticizes DC mayor for not imposing earlier curfew amid protests Stopping Israel's annexation is a US national security interest MORE on the impeachment fight. 
 
Schiff referenced the report as he was in the final stretch of his closing argument on the Senate floor on Friday night. 
 
"CBS News report that a Trump confidant said that GOP senators were warned '... vote against the president and your head will be on a pike,'" Schiff said from the Senate floor. 
 
Schiff had managed to win some smiles from Republicans, including Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump tweets as tensions escalate across US This week: Senate reconvenes as protests roil nation amid pandemic Trump asserts his power over Republicans MORE (R-S.C.), during his closing statement but the moment drew immediate blowback from Republicans, both from allies of the president and more centrist GOP senators seen as swing votes. 
 
 
"That's not true," she said several times from her seat, loudly enough to be overheard from the Senate gallery.
 
Collins said in a subsequent statement that “not only have I never heard the ‘head on the pike’ line, but also I know of no Republican Senator who has been threatened in any way by anyone in the Administration.”
 
 
"That's where he lost me," Murkowski told reporters after the trial wrapped, adding that Schiff "overreached." 
 
Schiff continued to reference the CBS News report, despite the audible reaction from Republicans, adding "I don't know if that's true, but when I read that I was struck by the irony, by the irony."
 
But Republicans continued to verbally push back, with Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoIRS proposes guidance for expanded carbon capture tax credit No better time to modernize America's energy infrastructure EPA's Wheeler grilled by Democrats over environmental rollbacks amid COVID-19 MORE (R-Wyo.) overheard saying "no," and Sen. Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischHillicon Valley: Lawmakers demand answers on Chinese COVID hacks | Biden re-ups criticism of Amazon | House Dem bill seeks to limit microtargeting Senate panel approves Trump nominee under investigation Hillicon Valley: Trump threatens Michigan, Nevada over mail-in voting | Officials call for broadband expansion during pandemic | Democrats call for investigation into Uber-Grubhub deal MORE (R-Idaho) overheard adding "that's not true." 
 
Amid the verbal pushback, Schiff paused mid-sentence and turned toward the Republican side of the room, adding, "I hope it's not true. I hope it's not true."
 
The slight caveat wasn't enough to quell the Republican furor. 
 
Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordGOP senator calls on State Department to resume passport application processing GOP senators urge Trump not to restrict guest worker visas Senate revives surveillance brawl MORE (R-Okla.) said the remark was "one of the most remarkable moments." 

"That is completely totally false, and all of us were shaking our heads 'like where did that story come from' and Adam Schiff just kept saying it," he said.

Lankford that "the whole room was visibly upset on our side of it. ...That's insulting and demeaning." 
 
 
Barrasso, speaking to reporters after the trial ended, vehemently denied that the threat from Trump ever happened. 

"He has basically offended every Republican senator in there tonight," Barrasso told reporters. 
 
 
Some Democrats also distanced themselves from the House Intelligence Committee chairman. 
 
 
"I don't know why people do that," Manchin added. "That could have been left out that's for sure." 
 
 
"That was the only time I heard a loud audible reaction from the Republican side. ...We know the president attacks people that work for him," Brown sad. "We know that there is fear of him throughout the Republican caucus." 
 
Scott Wong contributed
 
Updated: 11:26 p.m.