Romney: 'It's very likely I'll be in favor of witnesses' in Trump impeachment trial

Utah Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyCoronavirus and America's economic miracle Former Romney strategist joins anti-Trump Lincoln Project Romney defends Joe Scarborough, staffer's widower: 'Enough already' MORE (R) said Saturday that it is “very likely” he will be in favor of calling witnesses in the Senate impeachment trial against President TrumpDonald John TrumpMinneapolis erupts for third night, as protests spread, Trump vows retaliation Stocks open mixed ahead of Trump briefing on China The island that can save America MORE.

However, the GOP lawmaker said he will hold off on making his final decision until after Democratic impeachment managers and the president’s defense lawyers conclude their opening arguments.

"I think it's very likely I'll be in favor of witnesses, but I haven't made a decision finally yet and I won't until the testimony is completed," the Utah Republican said Saturday after the first day of the Trump team’s opening arguments, CNN reported.

ADVERTISEMENT

Romney declined to say whether he thought the president’s defense team was effective in the opening hours of their arguments, saying, "I just don't have any comments on the process or the evidence until the trial is over,” CNN reported.

Earlier this month, Romney was the first GOP lawmaker to specifically say that he wanted to hear from former White House national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonHave the courage to recognize Taiwan McConnell says Obama administration 'did leave behind' pandemic plan Trump company lawyer warned Michael Cohen not to write 'tell-all' book: report MORE in the course of the impeachment trial.

Romney told reporters at the Capitol that he wants to find out “what he knows” about Trump’s contacts with Ukraine, the central issue in the impeachment effort against the president.

“I would like to be able to hear from John Bolton. What the process is to make that happen, I don’t have an answer for you,” Romney said.

Bolton has yet to be subpoenaed by lawmakers in the trial, and Democrats will need four Republicans to support their efforts if they are going to call the former Trump administration officials or other witnesses. 

Bolton has said he would testify if subpoenaed by the Senate.

Fellow GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump administration gives renewables more time to take advantage of tax credits | House Republicans introduce bill to speed mining projects for critical minerals | Watchdog faults EPA communications in contamination of NC river The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Unemployment claims now at 41 million with 2.1 million more added to rolls; Topeka mayor says cities don't have enough tests for minorities and homeless communities Trump administration gives renewables more time to take advantage of tax credits MORE (Maine) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump administration gives renewables more time to take advantage of tax credits | House Republicans introduce bill to speed mining projects for critical minerals | Watchdog faults EPA communications in contamination of NC river Trump administration gives renewables more time to take advantage of tax credits GOP senators urge Trump not to restrict guest worker visas MORE (Alaska) have also both indicated an openness to hearing from further witnesses.