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Romney: 'Increasingly likely' other GOP senators will support hearing from Bolton

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyBudowsky: Democracy won, Trump lost, President Biden inaugurated Biden's inauguration marked by conflict of hope and fear Romney: Founders didn't intend pardons to be used for 'cronies' MORE (R-Utah) said on Monday that he believes it is more likely other Republican senators will support subpoenaing former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonPence, other GOP officials expected to skip Trump send-off NSA places former GOP political operative in top lawyer position after Pentagon chief's reported order After insurrection: The national security implications MORE in the wake of an explosive New York Times report.

Romney said it’s “increasingly apparent” that the Senate should hear from Bolton after the Times reported that he claims in his forthcoming memoir that President TrumpDonald TrumpClinton, Bush, Obama reflect on peaceful transition of power on Biden's Inauguration Day Arizona Republican's brothers say he is 'at least partially to blame' for Capitol violence Biden reverses Trump's freeze on .4 billion in funds MORE tied Ukraine aid to help with investigations into Democrats.

“It’s pretty fair to say John Bolton has relevant testimony,” Romney told reporters. "I think it's increasingly likely that other Republicans will join those of us who think we should hear from John Bolton."

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Bolton’s forthcoming memoir has thrown a curveball into Trump’s impeachment trial, which had appeared to be on track to wrap up this week.

Trump has denied Bolton’s allegation, and GOP allies, including Rep. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from Inauguration Day Trump leaves White House, promises to be back in 'some form' LIVE INAUGURATION COVERAGE: Biden signs executive orders; press secretary holds first briefing MORE (R-N.C.), have argued that it doesn’t change the fact that Ukraine has said it didn’t feel pressure to investigate Democrats including former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenKaty Perry and her 'Firework' close out inauguration TV special Arizona Republican's brothers say he is 'at least partially to blame' for Capitol violence Tom Hanks: After years of 'troubling rancor,' Inauguration Day 'is about witnessing the permanence of our American ideal' MORE and his son Hunter Biden.

But Democrats have seized on the allegation as evidence that the Senate needs to call new witnesses.

The chamber is expected to vote later this week on whether to call witnesses. If that vote is successful, both sides would then be able to make motions for specific individuals that would be voted on by the Senate.

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Democrats need four Senate Republicans to vote with them to successfully call witnesses.

So far, Romney is the only GOP senator who said he wants to hear from Bolton, though he’s stressed that he’ll make a final decision after opening arguments and questions from senators.

Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP senators praise Biden's inauguration speech LIVE INAUGURATION COVERAGE: Biden signs executive orders; press secretary holds first briefing The Memo: Biden prepares for sea of challenges MORE (R-Maine) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiMcConnell faces conservative backlash over Trump criticism GOP senators praise Biden's inauguration speech Biden urges Americans to join together in appeal for unity MORE (R-Alaska) have both signaled they are open to witnesses but want to make a decision after the initial phase of the trial. They have not weighed in on the Times story.