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Mike Lee defends Romney after vote on witnesses in Trump trial

Mike Lee defends Romney after vote on witnesses in Trump trial
© Greg Nash

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGOP senators press Justice Department to compare protest arrests to Capitol riot Matt Stoller says cheerleading industry shows why antitrust laws are 'insufficient' Senate chaos: Johnson delays exit as votes pushed to Friday MORE (R-Utah) came to the defense his fellow Utah senator Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt Romney Eugene Goodman to throw out first pitch at Nationals game White House briefed on bipartisan infrastructure deal but says questions remain On The Money: Consumer prices jumped 5 percent annually in May | GOP senators say bipartisan group has infrastructure deal MORE (R) after Romney bucked the party and voted to approve more witness testimony in the Senate’s impeachment trial against President TrumpDonald TrumpEx-DOJ official Rosenstein says he was not aware of subpoena targeting Democrats: report Ex-Biden adviser says Birx told him she hoped election turned out 'a certain way' Cheney rips Arizona election audit: 'It is an effort to subvert democracy' MORE.

“Mitt Romney is a good friend and an excellent Senator. We have disagreed about a lot in this trial. But he has my respect for the thoughtfulness, integrity, and guts he has shown throughout this process. Utah and the Senate are lucky to have him,” Lee tweeted.

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Romney earned rebukes from Republicans over his vote to allow more witnesses in the Senate’s impeachment trial. The measure still failed by a 49-51 margin, setting up a vote next week that is virtually guaranteed to acquit Trump.

The Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) “formally” disinvited Romney from its event next month over the vote.

Romney and Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSunday shows preview: Biden foreign policy in focus as Dem tensions boil up back home Why the Democrats need Joe Manchin White House briefed on bipartisan infrastructure deal but says questions remain MORE (R-Maine) were the only two Republicans to vote for the measure to allow more witnesses Friday night. Romney won his seat in 2018 and will not be up for a vote until 2024, but Collins is facing a tight reelection race in November.

While Romney has mostly been a loyal foot soldier in the Senate, largely voting along party lines, the GOP senator has voiced concern over Trump’s rhetoric and his dealings with Ukraine, which are at the center of the impeachment trial.