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Mike Lee defends Romney after vote on witnesses in Trump trial

Mike Lee defends Romney after vote on witnesses in Trump trial
© Greg Nash

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeRepublicans wrestle over removing Trump Lawmakers, leaders offer condolences following the death of Capitol Police officer GOP senators urging Trump officials to not resign after Capitol chaos MORE (R-Utah) came to the defense his fellow Utah senator Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyMcConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time Additional airlines ban guns on flights to DC ahead of inauguration Ben Shapiro stirs controversy by guest writing Politico newsletter MORE (R) after Romney bucked the party and voted to approve more witness testimony in the Senate’s impeachment trial against President TrumpDonald TrumpEx-Trump lawyer Cohen to pen forward for impeachment book Murkowski says it would be 'appropriate' to bar Trump from holding office again Man known as 'QAnon Shaman' asks Trump for pardon after storming Capitol MORE.

“Mitt Romney is a good friend and an excellent Senator. We have disagreed about a lot in this trial. But he has my respect for the thoughtfulness, integrity, and guts he has shown throughout this process. Utah and the Senate are lucky to have him,” Lee tweeted.

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Romney earned rebukes from Republicans over his vote to allow more witnesses in the Senate’s impeachment trial. The measure still failed by a 49-51 margin, setting up a vote next week that is virtually guaranteed to acquit Trump.

The Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) “formally” disinvited Romney from its event next month over the vote.

Romney and Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsMcConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time McConnell says he's undecided on whether to vote to convict Trump 'I saw my life flash before my eyes': An oral history of the Capitol attack MORE (R-Maine) were the only two Republicans to vote for the measure to allow more witnesses Friday night. Romney won his seat in 2018 and will not be up for a vote until 2024, but Collins is facing a tight reelection race in November.

While Romney has mostly been a loyal foot soldier in the Senate, largely voting along party lines, the GOP senator has voiced concern over Trump’s rhetoric and his dealings with Ukraine, which are at the center of the impeachment trial.