Pelosi says it was 'sad' to see McConnell 'humiliate' Chief Justice Roberts while presiding over witness vote

House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCoronavirus talks on life support as parties dig in, pass blame On The Money: Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire | Jobs report poised to light fire under COVID-19 talks | Tax preparers warn unemployment recipients could owe IRS Top Democrats say postmaster confirmed changes to mail service amid delays MORE (D-Calif.) said it was “sad” to see Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellCoronavirus talks on life support as parties dig in, pass blame Jobs report poised to light fire under COVID-19 talks Overnight Health Care: Ohio governor tests positive for COVID-19 ahead of Trump's visit | US shows signs of coronavirus peak, but difficult days lie ahead | Trump: COVID-19 vaccine may be ready 'right around' Election Day MORE (R-Ky.) "humiliate" Chief Justice John Roberts in President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says his faith is 'bedrock foundation of my life' after Trump claim Coronavirus talks on life support as parties dig in, pass blame Ohio governor tests negative in second coronavirus test MORE’s impeachment trial by voting against any additional witness testimony.

“It is a sad day for America to see Senator McConnell humiliate the Chief Justice of the United States into presiding over a vote which rejected our nation’s judicial norms, precedents and institutions which uphold the Constitution and the rule of law,” Pelosi tweeted Saturday.

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Senate Republicans on Friday voted 51-49 against a resolution that would have allowed witnesses to testify and additional documents to be introduced in the trial.

Several Senate Republicans were on the fence about whether to vote for or against allowing witnesses, but in the end, only Sens. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTennessee primary battle turns nasty for Republicans NRCC poll finds McBath ahead of Handel in Georgia Unemployment debate sparks GOP divisions MORE (R-Utah) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Campaign Report: Trump's visit to battleground Ohio overshadowed by coronavirus New polls show tight races for Graham, McConnell McConnell goes hands-off on coronavirus relief bill MORE (R-Maine) broke ranks and voted with the Democratic minority. 

Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOn The Money: Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire | Jobs report poised to light fire under COVID-19 talks | Tax preparers warn unemployment recipients could owe IRS Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire Hillicon Valley: Facebook removes Trump post | TikTok gets competitor | Lawmakers raise grid safety concerns MORE (R-Alaska) and Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderTrump-backed Hagerty wins Tennessee GOP Senate primary The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Key 48 hours loom as negotiators push for relief deal McConnell goes hands-off on coronavirus relief bill MORE (R-Tenn.) were the other main lawmakers on the bubble, but both decided to vote no on the resolution.

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Pelosi is also not the first Democrat to bring up Republicans' call for no witnesses and how it could affect members of the judiciary.

During the open question period on Thursday, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden VP race is highly fluid days before expected pick Senate Democrats demand answers on migrant child trafficking during pandemic Senate Democrats push to include free phone calls for incarcerated people in next relief package MORE (D-Mass.), who is also running for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, asked if the lack of witnesses in the impeachment trial was undermining the legitimacy of Roberts, who is presiding over the trial, and the entire justice system.

It is unclear if the question was meant as a dig at Roberts or at Senate Republicans. 

"At a time when large majorities of Americans have lost faith in government, does the fact that the chief justice is presiding over an impeachment trial in which Republican senators have thus far refused to allow witnesses or evidence contribute to the loss of legitimacy of the chief justice, the Supreme Court and the Constitution?" Warren's question read.

Lead impeachment manager and California Democrat Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffGOP chairmen hit back at accusation they are spreading disinformation with Biden probe Schiff, Khanna call for free masks for all Americans in coronavirus aid package House Intelligence panel opens probe into DHS's involvement in response to protests MORE, at whom the question was directed, answered that he did not think that lack of witnesses contributed to a loss of confidence in the justice. 

After blocking the Democrats' witnesses resolution, Senate Republicans adopted a resolution to reconvene on Monday, with House impeachment managers and Trump's lawyers able to deliver closing arguments and a final vote on the articles expected on Wednesday.