Senate set for closing arguments on impeachment

 
Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKentucky state official says foreign adversaries 'routinely' scan election systems Don't let 'welfare for all' advocates derail administration's food stamp program reforms Whistleblower retaliation: Stop confusing unlawful attacks with politics MORE (R-Ky.) won a big victory Friday when they defeated a push by Democrats to subpoena former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonOvernight Defense: Dem senator met with Iranian foreign minister | Meeting draws criticism from right | Lawmakers push back at Pentagon funding for wall We should listen to John Bolton The Hill's Morning Report - Sanders on the rise as Nevada debate looms MORE and other witnesses, suffering only two GOP defections on the key procedural vote.
 
On Monday, senators will hear four hours of closing arguments, the time equally divided between the House impeachment manager and the president’s lawyers.
 
 
While Alexander said the action didn't warrant impeachment, he and other senators have criticized Trump's actions.
 
The House managers will argue, however, if senators agree that Trump tried to use his authority to get a foreign country to influence the upcoming election, it is their constitutional duty to remove him from office for abuse of power.
 
The presidents’ lawyers are likely to focus on the arguments laid out last week by Harvard professor Alan DershowitzAlan Morton DershowitzA disgraced Senate and president have no business confirming judges Dershowitz files defamation suit against Boies, alleging extortion Sunday shows - 2020 Democrats make closing arguments in New Hampshire MORE, another member of the Trump legal team. Dershowitz, an opinion contributor for The Hill, contended that removing a president from office must require the violation of an actual law — a threshold a number of other constitutional scholars disagree with. 
 
They will also hammer the point that removing Trump from office and the ballot only nine months before the general election would be a subversion of democracy.
 
The Senate on Monday afternoon will adjourn as an impeachment court once the closing arguments are finished and reconvene as a legislative body so that senators will have a chance to debate the articles of impeachment. 
 
Under the Senate’s impeachment rules, senators are not allowed to deliver remarks or engage in colloquies. Under regular legislative procedures, they will be able to do so.
 
 
Each senator will get 10 minutes to speak on the floor and the debate could go well into the evening. Sen. Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesAs many as eight GOP senators expected to vote to curb Trump's power to attack Iran Senate set for closing arguments on impeachment Schiff sparks blowback with head on a 'pike' line MORE (R-Mont.) is scheduled to preside over the chamber from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday in case senators want to speak that late.
 
The Senate is scheduled to debate the impeachment articles in legislative session on Monday afternoon, Tuesday and Wednesday.
 
At 4 p.m. Wednesday, the Senate will reconvene as a court to vote on the articles of impeachment, with each senator expected to rise at his or her desk to announce whether or not Trump should be removed from office.
 
Following the vote, the trial will immediately conclude Wednesday afternoon.