Rand Paul reads alleged whistleblower's name on Senate floor

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRon Paul hospitalized in Texas The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump previews SCOTUS nominee as 'totally brilliant' Rand Paul says he can't judge 'guilt or innocence' in Breonna Taylor case MORE (R-Ky.) read the name of the alleged whistleblower at the center of the House impeachment inquiry on the Senate floor Tuesday.

The public remarks marked the latest attempt by Paul to out the identity of the individual alleged to be the whistleblower. He submitted a question last week during President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal prosecutor speaks out, says Barr 'has brought shame' on Justice Dept. Former Pence aide: White House staffers discussed Trump refusing to leave office Progressive group buys domain name of Trump's No. 1 Supreme Court pick MORE's impeachment trial that included the person’s name.

“I think they made a big mistake not allowing my question. My question did not accuse anybody of being a whistleblower,” Paul said from the Senate floor Tuesday.

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Paul then read his question, while standing next to a sign that that reiterated the question. Paul submitted a question during last week's two-day question-and-answer period that included the name of the alleged whistleblower.

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, who has been presiding over the impeachment trial, had privately indicated to Republicans that he would not read aloud Paul's question.

The Kentucky Republican, however, forced the issue by submitting his question on the Senate floor. Because Roberts reads the senators questions, it would have put him in the position of publicly outing the individual.

Roberts instead declined to read the question as submitted; it was the only question he formally rejected.

The Hill is not naming the individual being targeted by Republicans. It is also typically the policy of The Associated Press and other major news outlets not to reveal the identity of whistleblowers, who enjoy federal protections against retribution.