Schumer warns Kavanaugh and Gorsuch they will 'pay the price'

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerWells Fargo told employees to delete TikTok from work phones Democrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' A renewed emphasis on research and development funding is needed from the government MORE (D-N.Y.) said the two Trump-appointed conservative Supreme Court justices “will pay the price” for “awful decisions” in abortion rights cases.

Schumer addressed justices Neil GorsuchNeil GorsuchIn banning LGBTQ discrimination, did Supreme Court license sex discrimination? Roberts court tempers conservative expectations OVERNIGHT ENERGY: WH pushed for 'correction' to Weather Service tweet contradicting Trump in 'Sharpiegate' incident, watchdog says | Supreme Court rules that large swath of Oklahoma belongs to Native American tribe MORE and Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughRoberts court tempers conservative expectations OVERNIGHT ENERGY: WH pushed for 'correction' to Weather Service tweet contradicting Trump in 'Sharpiegate' incident, watchdog says | Supreme Court rules that large swath of Oklahoma belongs to Native American tribe Five takeaways from Supreme Court's rulings on Trump tax returns MORE in front of a crowd at the Supreme Court and appeared to threaten Senate Republicans and the administration if the court voted in favor of the Louisiana abortion law that could result in the court revisiting the protections provided in the Roe v. Wade ruling.

“I want to tell you, Justice Kavanaugh and Justice Gorsuch, you have unleashed a whirlwind, and you will pay the price,” Schumer said as the judges hear opening arguments on the case Wednesday. “You won’t know what hit you if you go forward with these awful decisions.”

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Schumer suggested there would be an electoral blowback in the general election after the court reaches a decision, which is expected in late June. 

“We will tell President TrumpDonald John TrumpWayfair refutes QAnon-like conspiracy theory that it's trafficking children Stone rails against US justice system in first TV interview since Trump commuted his sentence Federal appeals court rules Trump admin can't withhold federal grants from California sanctuary cities MORE and Senate Republicans who have stacked the court with right-wing ideologies that you’re going to be gone in November, and you will never be able to do what you’re trying to do now ever, ever again,” Schumer said. “You’re gone in November.”

 The comments immediately drew criticism from GOP lawmakers, such as Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Signs of a Trump, Fauci rift on display Meadows trying to root out suspected White House leakers by feeding them info: Axios Trump wears mask during visit to Walter Reed MORE (R-N.C.), who said Schumer was threatening the judges.  

“Did Senate Democrat leader Schumer just threaten two conservative justices?” he tweeted. “Where is the media?”

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Schumer spokesman Justin Goodman accused critics of deliberately misinterpreting the senator's remarks.

“Sen. Schumer’s comments were a reference to the political price Senate Republicans will pay for putting these justices on the court, and a warning that the justices will unleash a major grassroots movement on the issue of reproductive rights against the decision," Goodman said in a statement.

“For Justice Roberts to follow the right wing’s deliberate misinterpretation of what Sen. Schumer said, while remaining silent when President Trump attacked Justices [Sonia] Sotomayor and [Ruth Bader] Ginsburg last week, shows Justice Roberts does not just call balls and strikes.”

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The Louisiana law in the case before the justices requires doctors who have the ability to perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital that is within 30 miles of the clinic where the doctor provides care. A nearly identical law from Texas was struck down by the court four years ago.

The case is the first major test of Roe v. Wade under the now-conservative majority Supreme Court. 

Updated at 5:53 p.m.