Cruz 'feels great,' not exhibiting coronavirus symptoms amid self-quarantine: statement

Cruz 'feels great,' not exhibiting coronavirus symptoms amid self-quarantine: statement
© Greg Nash

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia next week Here's evidence the Senate confirmation process is broken MORE’s (R-Texas) office said he “feels great” and is not showing any coronavirus symptoms while he is in self-quarantine. 

Cruz, who announced his self-quarantine Sunday after coming in contact with someone who later tested positive for coronavirus, will remain in Texas until 14 days have passed since the Feb. 27 interaction.

“Sen. Cruz feels great, has not exhibited any symptoms of the coronavirus in the last 11 days, and is not currently experiencing any symptoms,” his office’s statement reads. 

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The statement says the Texas senator made the decision “out of an abundance of caution and to give everyone peace of mind, not because it was medically recommended.”

“Importantly, medical authorities assured Sen. Cruz that anyone who has interacted with him over the last 11 days should not be concerned about potential transmission and they do not require any special treatment, including self-quarantine,” the statement continues. 

Cruz’s office will remain open as the staff takes precautions to “ensure their own health and wellness” and the health and wellness of others, the statement said. 

The Texas senator interacted with an individual at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) who later tested positive for the coronavirus. 

He was the first of several members of Congress who have declared they will stay in self-quarantine for now, including Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzLawmakers introduce bipartisan Free Britney Act Performance or performance art? A question for voters in 2022 (and 2024) Six takeaways: What the FEC reports tell us about the midterm elections MORE (R-Fla.), Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsLoeffler meets with McConnell amid speculation of another Senate run Georgia agriculture commissioner launches Senate campaign against Warnock Poll shows tight GOP primary for Georgia governor MORE (R-Ga.) and Rep. Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarOvernight Health Care: CDC director warns of 'pandemic of the unvaccinated' | Biden says social media platforms 'killing people' | Florida accounts for 20 percent of new cases Hillicon Valley: Biden: Social media platforms 'killing people' | Tech executives increased political donations amid lobbying push | Top House antitrust Republican forms 'Freedom from Big Tech Caucus' Top House antitrust Republican forms 'Freedom from Big Tech Caucus' MORE (R-Ariz.) who interacted with the same individual at CPAC.

Rep. Julia BrownleyJulia Andrews BrownleyHouse passes veterans contraception, LGBTQ business bills previously blocked by GOP Overnight Defense: Tucker Carlson comments cause military rage | Capitol guard duty questioned | Vet who served in Marine One unit charged in insurrection Voters elected a record number of Black women to Congress this year — none were Republican MORE (D-Calif.) also announced her self-quarantine Monday.

Rep. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertMcCarthy, GOP face a delicate dance on Jan. 6 committee The Hill's Morning Report - Cheney 'honored' to serve on select committee Ethics panel dismisses GOP lawmaker's ,000 metal detector fine MORE (R-Texas) returned to Congress Monday, following the advice of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) physician’s recommendation, although he may have been exposed to the virus at CPAC.