McConnell sets first coronavirus stimulus package vote for Sunday

McConnell sets first coronavirus stimulus package vote for Sunday
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump 'no longer angry' at Romney because of Supreme Court stance On The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump faces backlash after not committing to peaceful transition of power MORE (R-Ky.) has set up the first vote related to a mammoth stimulus package over the coronavirus for Sunday.

McConnell on Friday teed up a “shell” bill — essentially a place holder for the agreement, if one is reached.

“I just filed cloture on the motion to proceed to a shell that will serve as the vehicle. ... Member-level discussion is going on as we speak. The goal is to reach agreements on each of the four components of the legislation by the end of the day,” he said.

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Under Senate rules, the earliest the first procedural vote could happen is Sunday.

McConnell’s decision to tee up the spending package comes as senators, their staff and top administration officials are still behind closed doors trying to reach an agreement.

The negotiations are focused on four groups: health care, small business, tax and impacted industries like airlines.

The package is expected to cost approximately $1 trillion, though GOP senators didn’t rule out that the number could climb as they negotiate with Democrats.

The Senate Republicans' plan would have provided $300 billion for small businesses and $1,200 in a one-time check for individuals who made up to $75,000.

As of Friday afternoon, Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSenate passes resolution reaffirming commitment to peaceful transition of power Susan Collins faces political land mine with Supreme Court fight Abortion stirs GOP tensions in Supreme Court fight MORE (R-S.D.) said two main sticking points remained: a debate over whether or not to bolster unemployment insurance and funding for hospitals.