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Tensions boil over on Senate floor amid coronavirus debate 

Tensions boiled over on the Senate floor Monday as senators debated a mammoth coronavirus stimulus package.

The normally clubby atmosphere was gone as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump seeks to freeze .4 billion of programs in final week of presidency McConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time Murkowski blasts Trump's election claims, calls House impeachment appropriate MORE (R-Ky.) opened the chamber with a blistering speech, Democrats temporary blocked Republicans from speaking and one senator was overheard calling the exchange “bullshit.”

McConnell eviscerated Democrats during his speech, at one point asking, "are you kidding me?"

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“It is time for Democrats to stop playing politics and step up to the plate,” McConnell added.

But the frustrations only escalated from there.

When Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsMcConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time McConnell says he's undecided on whether to vote to convict Trump 'I saw my life flash before my eyes': An oral history of the Capitol attack MORE (R-Maine) tried to get permission to speak, Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerNikki Haley unveils PAC ahead of possible 2024 White House bid Trump calls for 'NO violence' amid concerns of threats around inauguration Amazon cites death threats in push to keep Parler offline MORE (D-N.Y.) objected.

“This is unbelievable,” Collins could be overheard saying on the floor, before going to consult with GOP leadership.

Sen. Bill CassidyBill CassidyMcConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time Senator releases photos of man wanted in connection with Capitol riot Electoral College fight splits GOP as opposition grows to election challenge MORE (R-La.) then tried to speak, but Schumer similarly objected.

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The tactics sparked vocal pushback from Republican senators who were on be floor.

Sen. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonMcConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump's growing isolation as administration comes to an end Cotton: Senate lacks authority to hold impeachment trial once Trump leaves office MORE (R-Ark.), who was standing at the front of the chamber, could be overheard calling the maneuvers “bullshit.”

Schumer then tried to consent to speak, and Sen. Jim RischJim Elroy RischOvernight Defense: US sanctions NATO ally Turkey over Russian defense system | Veterans groups, top Democrats call for Wilkie's resignation | Gingrich, other Trump loyalists named to Pentagon board Will Biden choose a values-based or transactional foreign policy? GOP senator congratulates Biden, says Trump should accept results MORE (R-Idaho), who was in his seat at the back of the chamber, yelled that he also objected.

When Schumer tried to argue that he still has control of the floor, Sen. Ben SasseBen SasseMcConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time McConnell: Trump impeachment trial to start after Biden sworn in McConnell says he's undecided on whether to vote to convict Trump MORE (R-Neb.), who was presiding over the floor drama, replied: “No, you do not.”

McConnell and Schumer eventually reached an agreement to allow for senators to give speeches before a key procedural vote.

But the frustration continued to play out, as Collins used her speech to call Democrats blocking the bill, which they say was drafted only by Republicans, “disgraceful.”

Collins also walked over to directly confront Schumer while he was still on the floor, leaning toward him and pointing her finger at him.

“You are objecting to my speaking? This is appalling!” she said.

As Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinSchumer says Democrats will probe extremist groups after Capitol attack Trump's legacy is discord and division Schumer calls for 25th Amendment to be invoked after Capitol riots MORE (D-Ill.) was speaking, Risch tried at multiple points to ask a question.

“Time remains on the Republican side. They can use it as they wish,” Durbin replied. “I allowed the senator from South Dakota to finish his. I hope you’ll show that same respect.”