Sen. Lamar Alexander to self-quarantine after staff member tests positive for COVID-19

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderCoronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Randi Weingarten China lashes out at US over WHO withdrawal The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump backs another T stimulus, urges governors to reopen schools MORE (R-Tenn.) will self-quarantine after a staff member tested positive for the coronavirus.

David Cleary, Alexander's chief of staff, said the GOP senator had no symptoms and had tested negative for the coronavirus on Thursday. The staff member, according to Cleary, tested positive for the coronavirus on Sunday.

"After discussing this with the Senate’s attending physician, Senator Alexander, out of an abundance of caution, has decided not to return to Washington, D.C., and will self-quarantine in Tennessee for 14 days," he said.

No other staff in Alexander's office is expected to self-quarantine and most of the GOP senator's Washington, D.C., staff, like most offices on Capitol Hill, was already working remotely. 
 
Alexander is the latest senator who has had to self-quarantine after exposure to the virus. Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulHow conservative conspiracy theories are deepening America's political divide Gianforte halts in-person campaigning after wife, running mate attend event with Guilfoyle Rand Paul's exchange with Fauci was exactly what America needed MORE (R-Ky.) is the only senator known to have tested positive but others, including Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamLincoln Project offers list of GOP senators who 'protect' Trump in new ad The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump backs another T stimulus, urges governors to reopen schools Democrats awash with cash in battle for Senate MORE (R-S.C.), Rick Scott (R-Fla.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzLincoln Project offers list of GOP senators who 'protect' Trump in new ad How conservative conspiracy theories are deepening America's political divide Gianforte halts in-person campaigning after wife, running mate attend event with Guilfoyle MORE (R-Texas), have also self-quarantined in recent months. 
 
Alexander, who chairs the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, is expected to keep working remotely, including overseeing a hearing scheduled for Tuesday on the virus. 
 
“The senator will be working remotely and will chair the Senate health committee hearing on Tuesday morning by videoconference where the witnesses will be Dr. Anthony FauciAnthony FauciCDC to issue more guidance on school openings amid Trump criticism The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Teachers' union President Randi Weingarten calls Trump administration plan to reopen schools 'a train wreck'; US surpasses 3 million COVID-19 cases The Hill's 12:30 Report- Presented by Facebook - Trump threatens schools' funding over reopening MORE, Dr. Robert Redfield, Dr. Brett Giroir, and Dr. Stephen Hahn," Cleary said.
 
Fauci, Redfield and Hahn are also expected to testify before the committee remotely due to a White House staffer testing positive for COVID-19.
 
 
He warned in a statement, and during a private GOP lunch, about the lack of testing for lawmakers if they are not symptomatic, after McConnell and House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSupreme Court expands religious rights with trio of rulings Congress must act now to fix a Social Security COVID-19 glitch and expand, not cut, benefits Democrats see victory in Trump culture war MORE (D-Calif.) turned down the White House's offer of rapid testing machines.
 
“We’re doubling the amount of testing up to 2 million a week. There ought to be enough tests to test 535 members of Congress who come to one of the nation’s coronavirus hot spots before they go back home around the country and infect people in their districts,” Alexander said.
 
He added that, without testing, lawmakers traveling from Washington, D.C., to their home states could "represent sort of a virus-spreading machine."