SPONSORED:

Feinstein spoke to FBI about her husband's stock trades, handed over documents

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinBottom line Trump vetoes bipartisan driftnet fishing bill Dumping Abraham Lincoln? A word of advice to the 'cancel culture' MORE (D-Calif.) spoke to the FBI and handed over documents last month related to recent stock transactions by her husband that have come under public scrutiny.  

"Senator Feinstein was asked some basic questions by law enforcement about her husband’s stock transactions. ... She was happy to voluntarily answer those questions to set the record straight and provided additional documents to show she had no involvement in her husband’s transactions," a spokesman said. 

Feinstein's conversation with the FBI took place in April, and the spokesman said that "there have been no follow up actions on this issue." 

ADVERTISEMENT

Feinstein's husband sold shares of Allogene Therapeutics, a California biotechnology company, on Jan. 31 and at least $1 million in Allogene stock on Feb. 18, according to Senate records. 

Feinstein told CNN in March that  she had "no input" in her husband's finances.

"I have no input into his decisions. My husband in January and February sold shares of a cancer therapy company. This company is unrelated to any work on the coronavirus and the sale was unrelated to the situation," she said, according to CNN. 

News that the FBI had reached out to Feinstein comes as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump seeks to freeze .4 billion of programs in final week of presidency McConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time Murkowski blasts Trump's election claims, calls House impeachment appropriate MORE (R-Ky.) announced on Thursday that Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOfficials discussing 25th Amendment for Trump following violence at Capitol GOP senator says Trump 'bears responsibility' for Capitol riot Republican infighting on election intensifies MORE (R-N.C.) will temporarily step aside as chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee while the FBI investigates his stock trades. 

The Department of Justice has been conducting an investigation since March into Burr's sale of up to $1.72 million in stocks earlier this year. The stocks were sold in early February after senators received closed-door briefings on the national threat posed by the coronavirus but before most Americans were warned about the potential economic fallout of the pandemic.

Federal investigators seized Burr’s cellphone on Wednesday night as part of an investigation into alleged insider trading. Burr has denied using any information he learned in his capacity as a senator to guide his decisions regarding selling his stocks.