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Feinstein spoke to FBI about her husband's stock trades, handed over documents

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Pelosi, Mnuchin push stimulus talks forward, McConnell applies brakes MORE (D-Calif.) spoke to the FBI and handed over documents last month related to recent stock transactions by her husband that have come under public scrutiny.  

"Senator Feinstein was asked some basic questions by law enforcement about her husband’s stock transactions. ... She was happy to voluntarily answer those questions to set the record straight and provided additional documents to show she had no involvement in her husband’s transactions," a spokesman said. 

Feinstein's conversation with the FBI took place in April, and the spokesman said that "there have been no follow up actions on this issue." 

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Feinstein's husband sold shares of Allogene Therapeutics, a California biotechnology company, on Jan. 31 and at least $1 million in Allogene stock on Feb. 18, according to Senate records. 

Feinstein told CNN in March that  she had "no input" in her husband's finances.

"I have no input into his decisions. My husband in January and February sold shares of a cancer therapy company. This company is unrelated to any work on the coronavirus and the sale was unrelated to the situation," she said, according to CNN. 

News that the FBI had reached out to Feinstein comes as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi bullish, Trump tempers optimism | Analysis: Nearly 1M have run out of jobless benefits Trump casts doubt on hopes for quick stimulus deal after aides expressed optimism Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid MORE (R-Ky.) announced on Thursday that Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrAs Trump downplayed the virus publicly, memo based on private briefings sparked stock sell-offs: NYT Hillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns Bipartisan representatives demand answers on expired surveillance programs MORE (R-N.C.) will temporarily step aside as chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee while the FBI investigates his stock trades. 

The Department of Justice has been conducting an investigation since March into Burr's sale of up to $1.72 million in stocks earlier this year. The stocks were sold in early February after senators received closed-door briefings on the national threat posed by the coronavirus but before most Americans were warned about the potential economic fallout of the pandemic.

Federal investigators seized Burr’s cellphone on Wednesday night as part of an investigation into alleged insider trading. Burr has denied using any information he learned in his capacity as a senator to guide his decisions regarding selling his stocks.