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McConnell embraces subpoena of Obama-era officials

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden backs 0B compromise coronavirus stimulus bill US records over 14 million coronavirus cases On The Money: COVID-19 relief picks up steam as McConnell, Pelosi hold talks | Slowing job growth raises fears of double-dip recession | Biden officially announces Brian Deese as top economic adviser MORE (R-Ky.) signaled on Tuesday that he is backing efforts to subpoena Obama-era officials.

McConnell, speaking from the Senate floor, referenced Senate Judiciary Committee Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamBiden: Trump attending inauguration is 'of consequence' to the country The Memo: Harris moves signal broad role as VP Former US attorney asks for probe of allegations Graham pressured Georgia official MORE’s (R-S.C.) announcement that he will schedule a vote for a wide-ranging subpoena on June 4.

“Senate Republicans are taking steps to issue new subpoenas to a wide variety of Obama administration officials. ... The American people deserve answers about how such abuses could happen. And we intend to get those answers,” he said.

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Graham announced on Monday evening that that he would have the committee vote on the subpoena as part of an investigation into the court established by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) and “Crossfire Hurricane,” the name for the FBI’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Graham’s subpoena would cover dozens of officials including Attorney General William BarrBill BarrBiden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him Trump campaign, RNC announce 0 million post-election fundraising haul Michigan voter fraud hearing goes viral for alleged flatulence, unruly witness MORE and FBI Director Christopher Wray, as well as former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesThe case against Sally Yates Clyburn: Biden falling short on naming Black figures to top posts The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Calls mount to start transition as Biden readies Cabinet picks MORE, former national security adviser Susan Rice, former Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinTrump turns his ire toward Cabinet members Ex-deputy attorney general says Justice Dept. 'will ignore' Trump's threats against political rivals The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump's erratic tweets upend stimulus talks; COVID-19 spreads in White House MORE and former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Dem leaders back smaller COVID-19 relief bill as pandemic escalates Trump blasts special counsel Durham for moving too slowly Biden plans to keep Wray as FBI director: report MORE.

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonWatch live: Senate panel holds Russia investigation hearing Republican frustration builds over Cabinet picks Grassley returns to Capitol after having coronavirus MORE (R-Wis.), the chairman of the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee, is also months into a wide-ranging probe on potential wrongdoing or conflicts of interest stemming from the Obama administration and has indicated that he will also look into the investigation of former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him Biden: Trump attending inauguration is 'of consequence' to the country Biden says family will avoid business conflicts MORE has publicly pressured Republicans to dig into decisions stemming from the Obama-era Justice Department and FBI.

“Mitch, I love you, but this is 100% true. Time is running out. Get tough and move quickly, or it will be too late. The Dems are vicious, but got caught. They MUST pay a big price for what they have done to our Country. Don’t let them get away with this!“ Trump tweeted over the weekend in reference to the Obama administration.

McConnell, on Tuesday, said the Obama administration used the FISA court to “snoop” on Trump’s campaign. Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz found a total of 17 inaccuracies and omissions in the FISA warrants involving former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page. Horowitz said in his report that he did not believe the opening of the investigation was motivated by political bias. 

“This is just one of the realities that President Trump’s Democratic critics spent years calling conspiracy theories or inventions of the president’s mind. Yet here it is, in black and white, from exactly the kind of independent inspector general that Democrats rush to embrace when convenient,” McConnell said.