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Senate Republicans issue first subpoena in Biden-Burisma probe

Senate Republicans issued their first subpoena on Wednesday as part of wide-ranging investigations tied to the Obama administration, deepening a battle in Congress with implications for this fall's presidential race.

The Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee voted along party lines to issue a subpoena for Blue Star Strategies, a firm with ties to Ukrainian gas company Burisma Holdings.

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonCruz hires Trump campaign press aide as communications director Pelosi: Dems want commission focused on Capitol mob attack Pelosi jokes about Sen. 'Don' Johnson MORE (R-Wis.), the chairman of the panel, has homed in on the U.S. firm as he probes Hunter Biden's work for Burisma Holdings, where Biden — the son of presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden — was a member of the board until he stepped down in 2019.

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The subpoena asks for records from Blue Star Strategies from Jan. 1, 2013, to the present "related to work for or on behalf of Burisma Holdings or individuals associated with Burisma."

Johnson is also requesting an interview with top Blue Star officials to discuss the subpoena.

Senate Democrats fumed over Johnson's decision to schedule the vote amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Sen. Gary PetersGary PetersDeJoy set for grilling by House Oversight panel Top cops deflect blame over Capitol attack Law enforcement officials lay out evidence Capitol riot was 'coordinated' attack MORE (Mich.), the top Democrat on the panel, warned that the "extremely partisan investigation is pulling us apart." 

"This is not a serious bipartisan investigation in the tradition of this committee, and I do not believe we should be going down this road," Peters said during the committee meeting.

He tried to table the subpoena vote until the committee could get a closed-door briefing with FBI and intelligence community officials, but the move was blocked by Republicans. 

"This is not my choice to spend any amount of time on this vote. I would have issued the subpoenas quietly," Johnson said.

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He added that when the committee previously considered subpoenaing a former consultant for the firm there was a "bipartisan suggestion that if you want the records from Blue Star, why don't you just subpoena Blue Star? I said, so I will, so that's what we're doing here." 

Democrats have warned for weeks, both publicly and privately, that GOP senators are using the panel to target President TrumpDonald TrumpDonald Trump Jr. calls Bruce Springsteen's dropped charges 'liberal privilege' Schiff sees challenges for intel committee, community in Trump's shadow McConnell says he'd back Trump as 2024 GOP nominee MORE's political rivals and potentially inadvertently spread Russian misinformation.

Sen. Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanSenate Democrats call on GAO to review child care access barriers for disabled parents, kids Biden signs supply chain order after 'positive' meeting with lawmakers Koch-backed group launches ads urging lawmakers to reject COVID-19 relief bill MORE (D-N.H.) said Wednesday that Republicans were trying to investigate "partisan nonsense and conspiracy theories." 

"There is much urgent work for this committee and the Senate as a whole to carry out. This markup is not that work, to put it politely," Hassan said.

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisTo unite America, Biden administration must brace for hate Democratic strategists start women-run media consulting firm Grassley to vote against Tanden nomination MORE (D-Calif.) added that Johnson had made a "unilateral" decision to pursue the subpoena.

"You made the decision to force a vote on a purely political matter that will do absolutely nothing for those at risk of contracting COVID-19," Harris said, calling the subpoena a "political sideshow." 

Democrats say that Blue Star was willing to comply with Johnson's request for documents without a subpoena — something Johnson disputed.

Karen Tramontano, the co-founder and chief executive officer of Blue Star Strategies, sent a letter to Johnson on Wednesday saying that they had been indicating to committee staff that they would cooperate.

"At every opportunity we have indicated to the committee that it is our intention to cooperate. At no time have we ever stated or indicated in any way that we would not cooperate. Therefore, we are puzzled, despite our willingness to cooperate, why the committee is proceeding to vote on a subpoena," she wrote.

A spokesman for Johnson said the firm "has delayed our efforts for more than five months," including not letting GOP staff speak with one of its attorneys.

"Their only real efforts came after we noticed this markup, and we know even those have been woefully incomplete," the spokesman said.

Tensions flared in the committee on Wednesday as Johnson tried to move to the vote after allowing himself, Peters, Harris and Hassan to speak about the subpoena.

Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperTexas snowstorm wreaks havoc on state power grid The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by TikTok - Dems rest their case; verdict on Trump this weekend No signs of demand for witnesses in Trump trial MORE (D-Del.) then asked for five minutes to speak. Johnson said multiple times that he couldn't understand Carper, who then yelled, "I ask for unanimous consent to speak for five minutes, please."

Johnson then allowed Carper to speak, but warned that he would not get more than five minutes and told committee staff to "put the clock on."

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Republicans hold an 8-6 majority on the panel, allowing them to issue the subpoena despite opposition from Democrats as long as every GOP senator supported the move.

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGrassley to vote against Tanden nomination The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Ahead: One-shot vax, easing restrictions, fiscal help Haley isolated after Trump fallout MORE (R-Utah), the party's 2012 presidential nominee, was considered a vote to watch because he had previously raised concerns about investigations that appear "political." 

But Johnson said shortly before the committee vote that he expected every Republican to support his subpoena.

Romney told The Hill earlier this week that he was looking at Johnson's subpoena request. The Utah senator voted for the subpoena on Wednesday via proxy.

Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) said he was supporting Johnson's investigation because "we needed to get to the truth about the Bidens' relationship with Burisma."

"These hearings will provide the Senate with the full picture," he added.

Trump and some of his allies have floated a discredited narrative that Joe Biden tried to remove Ukrainian prosecutor Viktor Shokin to protect his son. No evidence has indicated that either of the Bidens engaged in criminal wrongdoing, and there was widespread concern at the time — both internationally and from a bipartisan coalition in Congress — about corruption within Shokin's office.

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Andrew Bates, a spokesman for Biden's campaign, said Johnson is "running a political errand for Donald Trump" in the middle of the coronavirus health crisis, including trying to "resurrect a craven, previously debunked smear against Vice President BidenJoe BidenBiden 'disappointed' in Senate parliamentarian ruling but 'respects' decision Taylor Swift celebrates House passage of Equality Act Donald Trump Jr. calls Bruce Springsteen's dropped charges 'liberal privilege' MORE."

"Then again, this is consistent with how Senator Johnson has callously downplayed the severity of the COVID-19 outbreak while the death toll rises," Bates added. "Senator Johnson should be working overtime to save American lives — but instead he's just trying to save the President's job."

Johnson is months into a probe with Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGrassley to vote against Tanden nomination Grassley says he'll decide this fall whether to run in 2022 Yellen deputy Adeyemo on track for quick confirmation MORE (R-Iowa) on the Bidens. They wrote in a request for information sent earlier this year that they were looking at “potential conflicts of interest posed by the business activities of Hunter Biden and his associates during the Obama administration."

Johnson said on Wednesday that he is still planning to issue a report on some of the findings soon.

“I'd like to get something out in the June time frame, personally, certainly before the August recess,” Johnson said. 

But the Biden-Burisma probe is just one part of wide-ranging investigations being run out of the Senate.

Amid public calls from Trump, Republicans are increasingly embracing using their majority to investigate some of the biggest grievances of the president and his allies, including the Bidens, the Russian interference investigation and the court created by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA).

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Trump, during a closed-door meeting Tuesday, urged Republicans to be “tough,” citing “Obamagate” — his unsubstantiated claim of crimes committed by the former president.

“The president said that on the issue of Crossfire Hurricane and FISA abuse that we’ve been acting like a bunch of weenies,” said Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) after the meeting.

Grassley and Johnson, with help from key administration officials, are also probing the investigation of former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn after the Justice Department dropped its case against him.

And Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamJohn Boehner tells Cruz to 'go f--- yourself' in unscripted audiobook asides: report Parliamentarian nixes minimum wage hike in coronavirus bill McConnell says he'd back Trump as 2024 GOP nominee MORE (R-S.C.) is set to have the Judiciary Committee vote on June 4 to issue a wide-ranging subpoena for documents and interviews with dozens of officials, including former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyJohn Durham's endgame: Don't expect criminal charges Trump DOJ officials sought to block search of Giuliani records: report Tina Fey, Amy Poehler to host Golden Globes from separate coasts amid pandemic MORE, former Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinRosenstein: Zero tolerance immigration policy 'never should have been proposed or implemented' Comey argues Trump shouldn't be prosecuted after leaving Oval Office Trump turns his ire toward Cabinet members MORE and former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesBiden directs DOJ to phase out use of private prisons The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from chaotic downtown DC Biden to name Merrick Garland for attorney general MORE.

The tactics have fueled tensions with Democrats.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerHillicon Valley: Biden signs order on chips | Hearing on media misinformation | Facebook's deal with Australia | CIA nominee on SolarWinds House Rules release new text of COVID-19 relief bill Budowsky: Cruz goes to Cancun, AOC goes to Texas MORE (D-N.Y.) on Wednesday said Republicans were turning into the “conspiracy caucus.”

“They’re holding sham hearings about the family of the president’s political rivals. ... They’re turning Senate committee rooms into the studio of 'Fox & Friends,' ” Schumer said, adding that “Trump’s wild conspiracy theories has overtaken just about every Senate Republican.”

— Updated at 1:31 p.m.