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Rosenstein to testify as part of Graham's Russia investigation probe

Rosenstein to testify as part of Graham's Russia investigation probe
© Greg Nash

Former Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinHouse Judiciary to probe DOJ's seizure of data from lawmakers, journalists The Hill's Morning Report - Biden-Putin meeting to dominate the week Media leaders to meet with Garland to discuss leak investigations MORE will testify next week as part of the Senate Judiciary Committee's probe into the origins of the FBI's Russia investigation, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump's biggest political obstacle is Trump The Hill's Equilibrium — Presented by NextEra Energy — Tasmanian devil wipes out penguin population The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden support, gas tax questions remain on infrastructure MORE (R-S.C.) announced on Wednesday.

The hearing, scheduled for June 3, marks the first public hearing Graham will hold as part of his deep dive into "Crossfire Hurricane," the name for the investigation into Russia's 2016 election interference and the Trump campaign. 

Graham said that Rosenstein will speak about "new revelations" included in Justice Department inspector general Michael Horowitz's report on surveillance warrant applications tied to former Trump campaign aide Carter Page. Rosenstein, who was interviewed as part of Horowitz's investigation, signed off on the third Page warrant renewal application.

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“This will be the first in a series of oversight hearings regarding all things Crossfire Hurricane and the Mueller investigation," Graham said.

Rosenstein, in a statement, confirmed that he would testify. 

"I am grateful to Chairman Graham for the opportunity to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee about information that has come to light concerning the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act process and the FBI’s counterintelligence decision-making, as a result of completed inquiries by Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz and ongoing reviews by U.S. Attorneys John DurhamJohn DurhamGarland stresses independence in first speech at DOJ Senate votes to confirm Garland as attorney general Special counsel investigating Russia probe to retire as US attorney MORE and Jeff Jensen," he said. 

Rosenstein left the Justice Department last year after two years in the Trump administration. He had increasingly become a target of the president's ire. 

The Senate easily confirmed Rosenstein to the Justice Department's No. 2 role in a 94-6 vote, but he quickly became a source of controversy

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First, he authored the memo Trump initially used to fire former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyMystery surrounds Justice's pledge on journalist records NYT publisher: DOJ phone records seizure a 'dangerous incursion' on press freedom Trump DOJ seized phone records of New York Times reporters MORE. After Comey's firing, Rosenstein subsequently appointed former FBI Director Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE as special counsel to investigate Russia's election meddling and the Trump campaign.

His role made him a target for Republicans on Capitol Hill and led to a showdown with House conservatives who floated impeaching him, saying he stonewalled their documents request. Trump allies also targeted him after the FBI raided the residence and hotel room of the president's personal lawyer Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenTrump's former bodyguard investigated in NY prosectors' probe: report Progressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC Outrage grows as Justice seeks to contain subpoena fallout MORE

He could face tough questions from Senate Republicans on the Judiciary Committee, who have grown increasingly skeptical about the decision to appoint Mueller as a special counsel. 

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyBiden's program for migrant children doesn't go far enough The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden support, gas tax questions remain on infrastructure 64 percent of Iowans say 'time for someone else' to hold Grassley's Senate seat: poll MORE (R-Iowa), who chaired the Judiciary Committee for part of Rosenstein's tenure, knocked him during a floor speech earlier this month. 

"Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein agreed to give me documents and he never did. He blamed Director Coats who then blamed Rosenstein," Grassley said. 

The Judiciary Committee hearing comes a day before the panel is scheduled to vote on a wide-ranging subpoena that would call for documents and interviews with dozens of former and current administration officials, including Comey, Rosenstein and other big names like former national security adviser Susan Rice and Attorney General William Barr.

A spokesperson for Graham confirmed that Rosenstein's agreement to testify will remove him from the subpoena. 

– Morgan Chalfant contributed to this report, which was updated at 2:19 p.m.