Republicans turning against new round of $1,200 rebate checks

Republican lawmakers are voicing deep skepticism about passing another round of $1,200 rebate checks as they contemplate the next and possibly final stage of coronavirus relief legislation.

Senate Republicans on Tuesday said they are more focused on reforming the Small Business Administration’s Paycheck Protection Program, providing more money for cash-strapped state and local governments, boosting benefits for Social Security recipients and fixing other elements of COVID-19 relief bills passed earlier this year.

Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordSenate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick Tulsa to resume search for race massacre mass graves next week GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday MORE (R-Okla.), a member of the Senate Finance Committee, said the CARES Act included rebates because the legislation was passed as the country was entering a lockdown in response to the pandemic and lawmakers wanted to get cash out to people as quickly as possible.

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He said the situation is now changed.

“Most folks are very grateful for the help at that point,” he said referring to late March. “But I don’t think we should set up a situation where we’re doing a check month after month after month.”

Lankford said with “the economy reopening, it’s a different day.”

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneySixth GOP senator unlikely to attend Republican convention Koch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump backs another T stimulus, urges governors to reopen schools MORE (R-Utah) said the prospect of Congress funding another round of rebate checks is “unlikely.”

He said Congress instead will “be looking at unemployment benefits” and “aid to states and cities and towns.”

“And I think it’s important for us to consider how we’re going to pay for all this and specifically how we’re going to deal with the structural deficit we have that adds a trillion to the debt every year. I hope that’s part of the next package,” he said.

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Romney said the rebate checks were passed as the country was heading into a lockdown to help people pay for supplies to get them through quarantine.

GOP senators say no one in their conference is championing the idea of another round of rebate checks at the moment.

A number of Senate Democrats also say that rebate checks aren’t sufficiently targeted and say other relief proposals should be given higher priority.

Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Reid Wilson says political winners are governors who listened to scientists and public health experts; 12 states record new highs for seven-day case averages Hillicon Valley: Facebook takes down 'boogaloo' network after pressure | Election security measure pulled from Senate bill | FCC officially designating Huawei, ZTE as threats Democrats, voting rights groups pressure Senate to approve mail-in voting resources MORE (D-Del.) said “the highest benefit” of including rebate checks in the CARES Act “was that it was immediate and it was widely distributed.”

“My concern is that it’s not focused in a way that is designed to help create or help sustain jobs, to deal with rental housing or education,” he said. “My top priority is a robust round of assistance to state and local governments.”

House Democrats included a second round of checks in their $3 trillion HEROES Act approved last month. The $1,200 payments would go to Americans earning up to $75,000 in annual income with an additional $500 per child.

Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerA renewed emphasis on research and development funding is needed from the government Data shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs Trump may be DACA participants' best hope, but will Democrats play ball? MORE (N.Y.) on Tuesday said he would support another round of rebate checks.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump on Kanye West's presidential run: 'He is always going to be for us' Marie Yovanovitch on Vindman retirement: He 'deserved better than this. Our country deserved better than this' Trump says Biden has been 'brainwashed': 'He's been taken over by the radical left' MORE and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin were leading proponents of direct payments to individuals and families in March, but the idea now faces mounting opposition among GOP senators.

“I’m not enthused about another round of rebate checks,” said Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamLincoln Project offers list of GOP senators who 'protect' Trump in new ad The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump backs another T stimulus, urges governors to reopen schools Democrats awash with cash in battle for Senate MORE (R-S.C.), one of Trump’s closest allies on Capitol Hill.

“I do believe we should be helping people on Social Security because the price of food has gone up and I don’t see any end in sight,” he said. “A payment to Social Security recipients who are on fixed income of $50,000 and below might make sense.”

Despite the House passing a $3 trillion coronavirus relief bill last month, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHouse chairman asks CDC director to testify on reopening schools during pandemic Senate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick Pelosi says House won't cave to Senate on worker COVID-19 protections MORE (R-Ky.) hasn’t scheduled a vote on a Senate relief package before July 4. Instead, Republicans will focus on the National Defense Authorization Act, the Great American Outdoors Act and the confirmation of circuit court and other nominees this month.

Schumer, who has spent nearly two months pressing Republicans to pass a robust phase-four relief bill, this week has been more focused on pressing the Senate to pass a law enforcement reform bill by the July 4 recess in the wake of national outrage surrounding the death in Minneapolis of George Floyd, an unarmed black man. One police officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for eight minutes to pin him to the ground now faces murder and manslaughter charges.

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Democrats on Tuesday also pressed for a resolution to condemn Trump’s order to disperse peaceful protesters in front of the White House Monday and to bar the president from deploying U.S. troops against peaceful protesters on American soil.

Senate Republican Whip John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSenate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick Finger-pointing, gridlock spark frustration in Senate Clash looms over next coronavirus relief bill MORE (S.D.) said the wave of protests and debate on criminal and civil justice reform “could” delay the next round of economic relief talks.

“Hopefully this stuff will start to dissipate a little bit. Justice is going to be served. People are going to held accountable for what they did and so hopefully the more visible manifestations of those protests will start to hopefully fade over time,” he said.

Thune noted the Senate plans to hold multiple hearings this week on what should be included in the next relief bill, but he said moving a bill “probably doesn’t happen” until July.

At the same time, Republicans acknowledge there’s mounting pressure to pass another relief bill as the unemployment rate is projected to hit 20 percent, a level not seen since the Great Depression.

Some senators believe economic anxiety linked to unemployment and diminished economic prospects is likely fueling much of the anger and frustration that has wreaked havoc in cities around the country.

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“I don’t think we can ignore the fact that this civil unrest is happening against a backdrop of 20-plus percent unemployment,” said Sen. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyOvernight Defense: House Dems offer M for Army to rename bases | Bill takes aim at money for Trump's border wall | Suspect in custody after shooting at Marine training facility  Should the United States withdraw from the WTO? Defense spending bill includes M for Army to change Confederate base names MORE (R-Mo.). “We have got to create more opportunity for meaningful work in our urban centers."

“The question of work, the question of good-paying jobs where people can support themselves, support a family and feel like they have a stake in our society I think is critical, so yeah I think there is a link,” he added.

Hawley is the lead sponsor of a proposal to have the federal government cover 80 percent of the wages for workers at any U.S. business, up to the national wage. He also wants to give businesses a bonus for rehiring laid off workers.

Hawley said he was a strong supporter of rebate checks in March but sees a second round as a lower priority.

“I’m going to say getting people their jobs back, which includes their health care, and prioritizing that, I think, really ought to be where we train our firepower,” he said.