SPONSORED:

Tim Scott to introduce GOP police reform bill next week

Tim Scott to introduce GOP police reform bill next week
© Keren Carrion

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottDemocrats lead in diversity in new Congress despite GOP gains The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Capital One - Pfizer unveils detailed analysis of COVID-19 vaccine & next steps GOP senators congratulate Harris on Senate floor MORE (S.C.) said on Thursday that he will introduce Republicans’ police reform bill by the middle of next week.

Scott was appointed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate approves two energy regulators, completing panel On The Money: Biden announces key members of economic team | GOP open to Yellen as Treasury secretary, opposed to budget pick | GAO: Labor Department 'improperly presented' jobless data Senate GOP open to confirming Yellen to be Biden's Treasury secretary MORE (R-Ky.) to lead a working group of GOP senators tasked with proposing reform legislation after George Floyd’s death in the custody of Minneapolis police.

Scott said that he expects to get finalized text of the legislation Thursday night or Friday. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“We’ve had a couple of additions to some of the things that we’re going to add to the bill, so we’ll have a text back on the current draft tonight, latest tomorrow, with all the corrections in it," he said.

"After meeting with members of Congress and more senators, I think we’ll probably add two to three more items to the list and then hopefully by Monday, I can get all that drafted up and in the package, which gives me a chance by Tuesday to drop it or by Wednesday at the latest," he added.

According to a draft circulated earlier this week, Scott’s bill would, among other provisions, increase funding for police body cameras and penalize not wearing them by reducing grants. It would also tie grant eligibility to reporting uses of force that cause death or serious injury to the FBI and to states maintaining a system that shares police records. 

Democrats have appeared skeptical that Scott's forthcoming proposal would go far enough for them to support it. House and Senate Democrats unveiled a sweeping bill earlier this week that banned chokeholds and overhauled "qualified immunity," which shields police offers from lawsuits, an idea dismissed by Republicans as a non-starter.

"Tim Scott is a good person, and I’ve worked with him, talked to him and respect him. I hope that he’ll step up. He can make a significant and historic contribution if he can bring the Republicans to a point where they are truly supportive of meaningful reform," said Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinOvernight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases Bipartisan Senate group holding coronavirus relief talks amid stalemate The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - COVID-19 fears surround Thanksgiving holiday MORE (D-Ill.). 

ADVERTISEMENT

Scott has been leading a working group that also includes Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham: Trump should attend Biden inauguration 'if' Biden wins Biden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Georgia governor rejects Trump's call to 'overrule' elections officials with emergency powers MORE (R-S.C.) and GOP Sens. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoGraham: Trump should attend Biden inauguration 'if' Biden wins As Biden administration ramps up, Trump legal effort drags on The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump holds his last turkey pardon ceremony MORE (W.Va.), John CornynJohn CornynSenate GOP open to confirming Yellen to be Biden's Treasury secretary Biden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Trump's NATO ambassador pledges 'seamless' transition to Biden administration MORE (Texas), Ben SasseBen SasseTrump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism The Memo: Trump election loss roils right Whoopi Goldberg blasts Republicans not speaking against Trump: 'This is an attempted coup' MORE (Neb.) and James LankfordJames Paul LankfordEthics experts ask Senate to investigate Graham's probe of mail-in voting The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Capital One - Pfizer unveils detailed analysis of COVID-19 vaccine & next steps GOP senators congratulate Harris on Senate floor MORE (Okla.).

He also met with White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump holds his last turkey pardon ceremony Overnight Defense: Pentagon set for tighter virus restrictions as top officials tests positive | Military sees 11th COVID-19 death | House Democrats back Senate language on Confederate base names Trump administration revives talk of action on birthright citizenship MORE and Trump son-in-law and adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerKushner going to Saudi Arabia, Qatar in last-ditch diplomatic push The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Coast-to-coast fears about post-holiday COVID-19 spread The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - COVID-19 fears surround Thanksgiving holiday MORE earlier this week, as well as Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanCheney, top GOP lawmakers ask Trump campaign for proof of election fraud New RSC chairman sees 'Trumpism' as future Sunday shows preview: Biden team gears up for transition, Trump legal battles continue and pandemic rages on MORE (R-Ohio) on Thursday. 

“We agree on a lot of things ... moving in the right direction," Scott said after his meeting with Jordan.