Tim Scott shares racist and threatening messages he's received over police reform bill

Tim Scott shares racist and threatening messages he's received over police reform bill
© Bonnie Cash

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottDOJ announces agencywide limits on chokeholds and no-knock entries Lobbying world As Biden falters, a two-man race for the 2024 GOP nomination begins to take shape MORE (R-S.C.) shared racist and threatening messages he’s received in recent days over the GOP police reform bill during a closed-door lunch with Senate Republicans on Tuesday. 

Scott, the only Black GOP senator, is leading the party's police reform effort, and he's gotten multiple hateful and racist voicemails that have been reviewed by NBC News. The messages included profanity, threats on the senator’s life and references to Confederate flags and the Ku Klux Klan. 

The network noted one message called Scott an “Uncle Tom” and another said he was going to die because he is a Black man in the South.

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Scott’s office reportedly gave all threatening emails and voicemails to the U.S. Capitol Police, and at least two of his colleagues have proposed that he obtain extra security, which is being considered, a spokesman from his office told NBC News.  

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyWoman allegedly abused by Nassar after he was reported to FBI: 'I should not be here' Democrat rips Justice for not appearing at US gymnastics hearing Senators denounce protest staged outside home of Justice Kavanaugh MORE (R-Iowa) reacted to messages on Twitter, saying he was “shocked.”

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Lawmakers sometimes receive death threats when they are involved in high-profile debates. Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsWelcome to ground zero of climate chaos A tale of two chambers: Trump's power holds in House, wanes in Senate Bipartisan blip: Infrastructure deal is last of its kind without systemic change MORE (R-Maine) received increased security during the contentious process to confirm Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughSenators denounce protest staged outside home of Justice Kavanaugh Why isn't Harris leading the charge against the Texas abortion law? Cori Bush introduces legislation aimed at expanding access to emergency rental assistance funds MORE.

Several people have been caught making threats against lawmakers in recent years, including a white supremacist in Georgia who pleaded guilty in 2018 to threatening both Scott and Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerBiden discusses agenda with Schumer, Pelosi ahead of pivotal week CEOs urge Congress to raise debt limit or risk 'avoidable crisis' If .5 trillion 'infrastructure' bill fails, it's bye-bye for an increasingly unpopular Biden MORE (D-N.Y.). 

A Florida man was sentenced to two decades in prison after he mailed explosives to Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisStefanik in ad says Democrats want 'permanent election insurrection' Live coverage: California voters to decide Newsom's fate Florida woman faces five years in prison for threatening to kill Harris MORE (D-Calif.) and Cory BookerCory BookerDOJ announces agencywide limits on chokeholds and no-knock entries Fighting poverty, the Biden way Top Senate Democrats urge Biden to take immediate action on home confinement program MORE (D-N.J.), former President Obama, former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump endorses challenger in Michigan AG race On The Money: Democrats get to the hard part Health Care — GOP attorneys general warn of legal battle over Biden's vaccine mandate MORE and former presidential candidate Tom SteyerTom SteyerOvernight Energy: 'Eye of fire,' Exxon lobbyist's comments fuel renewed attacks on oil industry | Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline | More than 75 companies ask Congress to pass clean electricity standard Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline Six things to watch as California heads for recall election MORE, among others. 

Scott’s police reform bill would allow the federal government to withhold funds from departments if police don’t improve data collection, training, de-escalation of situations and the duty to intervene. Democrats have condemned the bill saying it is “irrevocably flawed” and doesn’t go far enough.

Senate Democrats plan to block Scott's bill during a Wednesday vote, leaving the possibility for a bipartisan compromise up in the air.