Sen. Rand Paul says he and his wife were 'attacked by an angry mob' after Trump speech

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRon Paul hospitalized in Texas The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump previews SCOTUS nominee as 'totally brilliant' Rand Paul says he can't judge 'guilt or innocence' in Breonna Taylor case MORE (R-Ky.) was met with protesters early Friday while walking with his wife from the White House following President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says voters should choose who nominates Supreme Court justice Trump, Biden will not shake hands at first debate due to COVID-19 Pelosi: Trump Supreme Court pick 'threatens' Affordable Care Act MORE’s closing speech at the Republican National Convention.

“Just got attacked by an angry mob of over 100, one block away from the White House,” Paul tweeted, while thanking the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department for “literally saving our lives.”

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Video uploaded to Twitter by a bystander showed Paul and his wife, Kelley Paul, being escorted by police through a crowd of protesters following the events at the White House.

Some officers can be heard shouting “move back” at the crowd of protesters as they chanted for the senator to “say her name,” a common refrain from demonstrators regarding the police killing of Breonna Taylor in Paul's home state of Kentucky.

During an appearance on “Fox & Friends,” Paul said that he and his wife were unharmed but said protesters were threatening to kill them. 

“They were yelling threats, they were trying to push the police over to get to me, they were grabbing at us,” Paul said.

When asked by host Steve Doocy to elaborate on the alleged threats, Paul said protesters threatened to “‘eff you up’ and kill you.”

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“I truly believe this with every fiber of my being — had they gotten at us, they would have gotten us to the ground, we might not have been killed, we might just have been injured by being kicked in the head or kicked in the stomach until we were senseless,” Paul elaborated. 

Paul noted that he was the senator who introduced the “Justice for Breonna Taylor Act,” which would prohibit federal law enforcement from carrying out a warrant "until after the officer provides notice of his or her authority and purpose."

“The irony is lost on these idiots. They’re trying to kill the person who's actually trying to get rid of no-knock raids,” Paul said.

The senator also claimed that the protesters possibly came from out of state and were “paid to be anarchists.”

The Hill has reached out to D.C. Police for comment.

Taylor, a 26-year-old Black emergency medical technician, was fatally shot by Louisville police back in March.

One clip of the incident with Paul, which has garnered more than 1.6 million views, shows an officer using a bicycle to push back protesters and Paul grabbing his arm to keep the man from falling.

The video does not appear to show Paul or his wife being touched by any protesters. The couple did not appear to be injured.

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The Hill has reached out to the senator’s office for comment.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate GOP set to vote on Trump's Supreme Court pick before election Supreme Court fight pushes Senate toward brink Crenshaw looms large as Democrats look to flip Texas House seat MORE (R-Texas) called the incident "horrific" and called for the "madness to stop." 

Other attendees leaving the White House were also approached by protesters, including Rep. Brian MastBrian Jeffrey MastSen. Rand Paul says he and his wife were 'attacked by an angry mob' after Trump speech Florida Republican apologizes after Facebook posts about sex, rape uncovered Most Black women since 2004 running for office this year MORE (R-Fla.).

Mast, who lost both legs and a finger while serving in Afghanistan in 2010, wrote: “They thought I would be an easy target because my prosthetics move slowly. They were wrong.”

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Protesters gathered in Lafayette Square and the Black Lives Matter plaza outside of the White House on Thursday night ahead of Trump’s speech, where he formally accepted the GOP’s 2020 presidential nomination.

Taylor’s death, in addition to the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and other Black Americans, has prompted nationwide protests calling for widespread police reforms.

The demonstration in Washington, D.C., also comes amid a period of civil unrest after last weekend's police shooting of 29-year-old Jacob Blake, a Black man who was shot in the back seven times by police while trying to get into his car in Kenosha, Wis. Blake is currently paralyzed from the waist down.

Updated at 9:24 a.m.