Cruz says he wouldn't accept Supreme Court nomination

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Republicans face tough decision on replacing Ginsburg Cruz: Trump should nominate a Supreme Court justice next week Renewed focus on Trump's Supreme Court list after Ginsburg's death MORE (R-Texas) said Sunday that he wouldn’t accept a Supreme Court nomination after President TrumpDonald John TrumpObama calls on Senate not to fill Ginsburg's vacancy until after election Planned Parenthood: 'The fate of our rights' depends on Ginsburg replacement Progressive group to spend M in ad campaign on Supreme Court vacancy MORE included his name on a list of potential nominees. 

The Texas senator told Fox News's “Sunday Morning Futures” that he would not be interested in joining the Supreme Court as a Trump nominee.

“It is deeply honoring,” he told Maria BartiromoMaria Sara BartiromoBiden's team says he views election against Trump as 'Park Avenue vs. Scranton' Ex-NFL player running for House as Republican blasts Democrats as 'narcissists and sociopaths' Cruz says he wouldn't accept Supreme Court nomination MORE when she asked if he wanted the job. “It's humbling to be included in the list. I'm grateful that the president has that confidence in me.”

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“But it's not the desire of my heart,” he added. “I want to be in the political fight. I want to be fighting to nominate and confirm three, four, five principled constitutionalist justices.

“I want to stay fighting right where I am in the U.S. Senate,” Cruz continued. 

Trump last week released a list of 20 potential Supreme Court nominees that included two other GOP senators, Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonRenewed focus on Trump's Supreme Court list after Ginsburg's death Republicans call for DOJ to prosecute Netflix executives for releasing 'Cuties' Loeffler calls for hearing in wake of Netflix's 'Cuties' MORE (R-Ark.) and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyRenewed focus on Trump's Supreme Court list after Ginsburg's death What Facebook's planned change to its terms of service means for the Section 230 debate Republican Senators raise concerns over Oracle-TikTok deal MORE (R-Mo.). 

After his name was announced, Cotton tweeted that it is “time for Roe v. Wade to go.” Hawley, meanwhile, said he had “no interest” in serving on the highest court in the U.S. 

Trump’s list also included Noel Francisco, the former solicitor general. 

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The White House released the list in hopes of garnering enthusiasm for the 2020 presidential election and the push for more conservative judges as Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenSenate Republicans face tough decision on replacing Ginsburg What Senate Republicans have said about election-year Supreme Court vacancies Biden says Ginsburg successor should be picked by candidate who wins on Nov. 3 MORE leads in national polls. 

Trump won support from conservative voters when he issued a similar list of potential Supreme Court nominees in May 2016. The president has nominated two justices to the Supreme Court — Neil GorsuchNeil GorsuchObama calls on Senate not to fill Ginsburg's vacancy until after election Trump reacts to Ginsburg's death: 'An amazing woman who led an amazing life' McConnell says Trump nominee to replace Ginsburg will get Senate vote MORE and Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughProgressive group to spend M in ad campaign on Supreme Court vacancy Senate Republicans face tough decision on replacing Ginsburg Trump reacts to Ginsburg's death: 'An amazing woman who led an amazing life' MORE — and could get the opportunity to nominate another, especially if he wins a second term.

The Republican Senate confirmed Trump's 200th overall judicial appointee in June.