Cruz says he wouldn't accept Supreme Court nomination

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzPoll: Trump dominates 2024 Republican primary field Republican politicians: Let OSHA do its job O'Rourke prepping run for governor in Texas: report MORE (R-Texas) said Sunday that he wouldn’t accept a Supreme Court nomination after President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump takes shot at new GOP candidate in Ohio over Cleveland nickname GOP political operatives indicted over illegal campaign contribution from Russian national in 2016 On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default MORE included his name on a list of potential nominees. 

The Texas senator told Fox News's “Sunday Morning Futures” that he would not be interested in joining the Supreme Court as a Trump nominee.

“It is deeply honoring,” he told Maria BartiromoMaria Sara BartiromoThe Memo: Fall in white population could add fuel to nativist fire A tale of two chambers: Trump's power holds in House, wanes in Senate The Memo: Biden beats Trump again — this time in the Senate MORE when she asked if he wanted the job. “It's humbling to be included in the list. I'm grateful that the president has that confidence in me.”

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“But it's not the desire of my heart,” he added. “I want to be in the political fight. I want to be fighting to nominate and confirm three, four, five principled constitutionalist justices.

“I want to stay fighting right where I am in the U.S. Senate,” Cruz continued. 

Trump last week released a list of 20 potential Supreme Court nominees that included two other GOP senators, Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonProgressive foreign policy should not be pro-autocracy Overnight Defense & National Security — Milley becomes lightning rod Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley becomes lightning rod on right MORE (R-Ark.) and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleySenators slow Biden with holds at Pentagon, State Overnight Defense & National Security — Milley becomes lightning rod Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley becomes lightning rod on right MORE (R-Mo.). 

After his name was announced, Cotton tweeted that it is “time for Roe v. Wade to go.” Hawley, meanwhile, said he had “no interest” in serving on the highest court in the U.S. 

Trump’s list also included Noel Francisco, the former solicitor general. 

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The White House released the list in hopes of garnering enthusiasm for the 2020 presidential election and the push for more conservative judges as Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse clears bill to provide veterans with cost-of-living adjustment On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default To reduce poverty, stop burdening the poor: What Joe Manchin gets wrong about the child tax credit MORE leads in national polls. 

Trump won support from conservative voters when he issued a similar list of potential Supreme Court nominees in May 2016. The president has nominated two justices to the Supreme Court — Neil GorsuchNeil GorsuchPresident Biden's vaccination plan is constitutional — and necessary Religious exemption to vaccine mandates may be difficult to obtain, as Amish case shows Can Biden defend his vaccine mandate? The 'nondelegation doctrine' may be the challenge MORE and Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughRepublicans keep distance from 'Justice for J6' rally Senators denounce protest staged outside home of Justice Kavanaugh Why isn't Harris leading the charge against the Texas abortion law? MORE — and could get the opportunity to nominate another, especially if he wins a second term.

The Republican Senate confirmed Trump's 200th overall judicial appointee in June.