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Democrat on Graham video urging people to 'use my words against me': 'Done'

Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzFinancial market transactions should not be taxed or restricted Democrats face big headaches on Biden's T spending plan Democrats introduce bill to give hotels targeted relief MORE (D-Hawaii) retweeted a video of Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP governors move to cut unemployment benefits as debate rages over effects Trump critics push new direction for GOP Graham warns about trying to 'drive' Trump from GOP: 'Half the people will leave' MORE (R-S.C.) after the 2016 death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia telling participants during a Senate meeting to "use my words against me."

At the time, the senator said he was against picking a justice right before a presidential election, stating that if then-candidate Donald Trump or Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzFormer OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden Seth Rogen says he's not in a feud with 'fascist' Ted Cruz, whose 'words caused people to die' GOP votes to replace Cheney with Stefanik after backing from Trump MORE (R-Texas) were president and a vacancy were left at the end of the their first term, the choice should be left to the winner of the next election. 

"I want you to use my words against me. If there's a Republican president in 2016 and a vacancy occurs in the last year of the first term, you can say Lindsey Graham said let's let the next president, whoever it might be, make that nomination."

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In 2016, Republicans prevented former President Obama's Supreme Court selection, saying the vacancy should not be filled in an election year.

Schatz retweeted the video of Graham, who is up for reelection this year, with just one word: "Done." 

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The resurfacing of Graham's statement comes just hours after the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgJudge Judy on expanding Supreme Court: 'It's a dumb idea' Court watchers buzz about Breyer's possible retirement Five hot-button issues Biden didn't mention in his address to Congress MORE on Friday. Ginsburg reportedly told her granddaughter her "most fervent wish" was that the next president would name her replacement.

Ginsburg's death has set the stage for a massive battle between Democrat and Republican lawmakers, throwing yet another curveball into the election just weeks before Nov. 3. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFormer OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden Lawmakers reach agreement on bipartisan Jan. 6 commission The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Masks off: CDC greenlights return to normal for vaccinated Americans MORE (R-Ky.) on Friday said that he would bring President TrumpDonald TrumpVirginia GOP gubernatorial nominee acknowledges Biden was 'legitimately' elected Biden meets with DACA recipients on immigration reform Overnight Health Care: States begin lifting mask mandates after new CDC guidance | Walmart, Trader Joe's will no longer require customers to wear masks | CDC finds Pfizer, Moderna vaccines 94 percent effective in health workers MORE's pick for the vacancy to a vote in the upper chamber.

"Americans reelected our majority in 2016 and expanded it in 2018 because we pledged to work with President Trump and support his agenda, particularly his outstanding appointments to the federal judiciary. Once again, we will keep our promise," McConnell said. 

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerBiden 'encouraged' by meeting with congressional leaders on infrastructure Republicans welcome the chance to work with Democrats on a bipartisan infrastructure bill Cheney sideshow distracts from important battle over Democrats' partisan voting bill MORE (D-N.Y.) also retweeted the older video of Graham after posting a tweet in honor of Ginsburg.

"The American people should have a voice in the selection of their next Supreme Court Justice. Therefore, this vacancy should not be filled until we have a new president," Schumer wrote, a direct quote from a statement McConnell released in 2016 after Scalia's death.