SPONSORED:

Klobuchar: GOP can't use 'raw political power right in middle of an election'

Klobuchar: GOP can't use 'raw political power right in middle of an election'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDurbin signals he isn't interested in chairing Judiciary Committee Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing MORE (D-Minn.) said Sunday the Republican Party set a precedent in 2016 in blocking President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee ahead of and upcoming election and urged her Republican colleagues to block a vote on any appointee nominated by President TrumpDonald John TrumpJudge rules to not release Russia probe documents over Trump tweets Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida MORE to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Mitt Romney did not vote for Trump in 2020 election The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett MORE

“State of the Union” host Jake TapperJacob (Jake) Paul TapperNY Times slammed for glowing Farrakhan op-ed: 'You would think he was a gentleman' Democrats condemn Trump's rhetoric against Michigan governor as allies defend rally Illinois governor blames Trump's allies for state's wrong direction on coronavirus MORE questioned Klobuchar on CNN on her comments pushing for a vote on Obama's nominee, Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein MORE, ahead of the 2016 election, asking her if the “Constitution is still clear,” as she said at the time in pushing for a vote.

“A new rule was set by our colleagues,” said Klobuchar, who is on the Senate Judiciary Committee, of the Republicans' decision to block Obama’s nominee in 2016. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“They set this precedent, they can’t mess around and use raw political power right in the middle of an election,” she added. 

Tapper also noted that the 2016 Supreme Court vacancy occurred 10 months out from the election, whereas there are now fewer than 50 days ahead of the forthcoming presidential election. 

Klobuchar also said a “major difference” is the timing, noting that people in her state are “voting right now.” 

Asked what Democrats may do to try to stop a vote, Klobuchar said “a number of” GOP senators have said they think the next president should appoint a nominee. 

Tapper pressed Klobuchar, asking her if there is another plan other than trying to appeal to Republicans. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“Right now, Ruth Bader Ginsburg just died recently. While Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi bullish, Trump tempers optimism | Analysis: Nearly 1M have run out of jobless benefits Trump casts doubt on hopes for quick stimulus deal after aides expressed optimism Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid MORE has said what he has said, these people aren't beholden to him,” Klobuchar responded, referring to the Republican Senate majority leader.

She added that different strategies should be considered, but again pointed to a number of Republican senators who are going to have to make a decision for themselves. 

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid Senate is leaning to the Democrats, big time, with a wave MORE (R-Maine.), one of most vulnerable GOP senators facing reelection in the fall, has come out and said the Senate should not vote to confirm Ginsburg’s successor before the election. 

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Senate to vote Monday to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to Supreme Court Senate GOP eyes Oct. 26 for confirming Barrett to Supreme Court MORE (R-Alaska) also said, ahead of Ginsburg’s death on Friday, that she would not vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee before the election. 

Republicans could not afford any more than three defections to confirm Trump’s nominee if all 47 members of the Senate Democratic caucus oppose Trump’s pick.