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GOP senators pan debate: 'S---show,' 'awful,' 'embarrassment'

Republican senators, one after the other on Wednesday, panned the first presidential debate between President TrumpDonald John TrumpJudge rules to not release Russia probe documents over Trump tweets Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida MORE and Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida Supreme Court reinstates ban on curbside voting in Alabama MORE.

They appeared exasperated by the chaotic, roughly two-hour clash that was marked by near constant crosstalk and personal attacks. And they argued more more focus should be put on policy when the two candidates meet again next month.  

"It was awful," Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Senate to vote Monday to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to Supreme Court Senate GOP eyes Oct. 26 for confirming Barrett to Supreme Court MORE (R-Alaska) told reporters. 

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Asked what she thought about the debate Sen. Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerGOP senators pan debate: 'S---show,' 'awful,' 'embarrassment' Hillicon Valley: Election officials prepare for new Russian interference battle | 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy | GOP senators unveil bill to update tech liability protections Google, Apple, eBay to meet virtually with lawmakers for tech group's annual fly-in MORE (R-Neb.) paused for a moment, before responding: "It was exhausting."  

Other GOP senators were more direct in their criticism with Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyMitt Romney did not vote for Trump in 2020 election Biden: Johnson should be 'ashamed' for suggesting family profited from their name The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by the Walton Family Foundation — Pope Francis expresses support for same-sex unions MORE (R-Utah) calling it an "embarrassment" and Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseSweden bans use of Huawei, ZTE equipment in new 5G networks McConnell aims for unity amid growing divisions with Trump Cornyn: Relationships with Trump like 'women who get married and think they're going to change their spouse' MORE (R-Neb.) calling it a "shitshow." 

"It was the least educational debate of any presidential debate I've ever seen," said Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid Senate is leaning to the Democrats, big time, with a wave MORE (R-Maine), who is in a tough reelection fight.  

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynThe Hill's Campaign Report: Obama to hit the campaign trail l Biden's eye-popping cash advantage l New battleground polls favor Biden Quinnipiac poll finds Biden, Trump tied in Texas Biden endorses Texas Democratic House candidate Julie Oliver MORE (R-Texas) compared the debate to a "brawl," while Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeHouse Democrat optimistic defense bill will block Trump's Germany withdrawal EPA gives Oklahoma authority over many tribal environmental issues GOP lawmakers gloomy, back on defense after debate fiasco MORE (R-Okla.) urged Trump to "restrain himself a little" during the next debate. 

Biden and Trump clashed over a host of issues during Tuesday's night face off, the first of the 2020 cycle, including climate change, healthcare and the Supreme Court. But the debate will be remembered more for how quickly it went off the rails as moderator Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceBiden's debate strategy is to let Trump be Trump Biden: Muting mics at debate 'a good idea,' we need 'more limitations' Ex-GOP senator on debate commission blasts Trump's bias accusations, warns of 'incalculable damage' MORE struggled to get the candidates to stick to their time limits and Trump sparked bipartisan criticism when he refused to denounce white supremacists.  

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Several GOP senators, including Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi bullish, Trump tempers optimism | Analysis: Nearly 1M have run out of jobless benefits Trump casts doubt on hopes for quick stimulus deal after aides expressed optimism Power players play chess match on COVID-19 aid MORE (R-Ky.), distanced themselves from Trump over those remarks. 

“With regard to the white supremacy issue, I want to associate myself with the remarks of Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottDemocrats unveil bill to reduce police violence against people with mental illness Liberals should embrace Trump's Supreme Court nominee Romney slams Trump for refusing to denounce QAnon on national television MORE,” McConnell told reporters. “I think he said it exactly correctly and that’s exactly how I would express myself on that issue." 

“He said it was unacceptable not to condemn white supremacists and so I do so in the strongest possible way,” the GOP leader added.