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GOP senators pan debate: 'S---show,' 'awful,' 'embarrassment'

Republican senators, one after the other on Wednesday, panned the first presidential debate between President TrumpDonald TrumpIran claims U.S. to lift all oil sanctions but State Department says 'nothing is agreed' Ivanka Trump, Kushner distance themselves from Trump claims on election: CNN Overnight Defense: Joint Chiefs chairman clashes with GOP on critical race theory | House bill introduced to overhaul military justice system as sexual assault reform builds momentum MORE and Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenSchumer vows to advance two-pronged infrastructure plan next month Biden appoints veteran housing, banking regulator as acting FHFA chief Iran claims U.S. to lift all oil sanctions but State Department says 'nothing is agreed' MORE.

They appeared exasperated by the chaotic, roughly two-hour clash that was marked by near constant crosstalk and personal attacks. And they argued more more focus should be put on policy when the two candidates meet again next month.  

"It was awful," Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - GOP torpedoes election bill; infrastructure talks hit snag White House digs in as infrastructure talks stall Schumer vows next steps after 'awful' GOP election bill filibuster MORE (R-Alaska) told reporters. 

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Asked what she thought about the debate Sen. Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerLobbying world On The Money: May jobs report to land at pivotal moment in Biden agenda | Biden, top GOP negotiator agree to continue infrastructure talks Friday JBS ransomware attack underscores threat facing meat industry MORE (R-Neb.) paused for a moment, before responding: "It was exhausting."  

Other GOP senators were more direct in their criticism with Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneySenators say White House aides agreed to infrastructure 'framework' Trump clash ahead: Ron DeSantis positions himself as GOP's future in a direct-mail piece Overnight Defense: Joint Chiefs warn against sweeping reform to military justice system | Senate panel plans July briefing on war authorization repeal | National Guard may have 'training issues' if not reimbursed MORE (R-Utah) calling it an "embarrassment" and Sen. Ben SasseBen SasseGOP senators applaud Biden for global vaccine donation plans Pence: Trump and I may never 'see eye to eye' on events of Jan. 6 White House: Biden will not appoint presidential Jan. 6 commission MORE (R-Neb.) calling it a "shitshow." 

"It was the least educational debate of any presidential debate I've ever seen," said Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenators say White House aides agreed to infrastructure 'framework' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - GOP torpedoes election bill; infrastructure talks hit snag White House digs in as infrastructure talks stall MORE (R-Maine), who is in a tough reelection fight.  

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynSenators say White House aides agreed to infrastructure 'framework' Cornyn calls on Biden and Harris to visit southern border: 'Y'all come visit' Progressive groups launch .5M ad buy to pressure Sinema on filibuster MORE (R-Texas) compared the debate to a "brawl," while Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofePentagon chief backs change to military sexual assault prosecution Overnight Defense: Biden participates in NATO summit | White House backs 2002 AUMF repeal | Top general says no plans for airstrikes to help Afghan forces after withdrawal Top Republican proposes leaving 1,000 US troops in Afghanistan into next year MORE (R-Okla.) urged Trump to "restrain himself a little" during the next debate. 

Biden and Trump clashed over a host of issues during Tuesday's night face off, the first of the 2020 cycle, including climate change, healthcare and the Supreme Court. But the debate will be remembered more for how quickly it went off the rails as moderator Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceChuck Todd reluctant to 'ban' election deniers from 'Meet the Press' Sunday shows - Biden foreign policy in focus Pompeo defends Trump on Russia in Chris Wallace interview MORE struggled to get the candidates to stick to their time limits and Trump sparked bipartisan criticism when he refused to denounce white supremacists.  

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Several GOP senators, including Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellCan Manchin answer his predecessor's call on voting rights? Biden at Sen. John Warner's funeral: He 'gave me confidence' Democrats' narrow chance to retain control after 2022 MORE (R-Ky.), distanced themselves from Trump over those remarks. 

“With regard to the white supremacy issue, I want to associate myself with the remarks of Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottThousands sent to emergency rooms every year due to violent police encounters: investigation Democrats fear they are running out of time on Biden agenda White House says Biden crime address won't undercut police reform bill MORE,” McConnell told reporters. “I think he said it exactly correctly and that’s exactly how I would express myself on that issue." 

“He said it was unacceptable not to condemn white supremacists and so I do so in the strongest possible way,” the GOP leader added.