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Susan Collins: 'We must all respect the outcome of elections'

Susan Collins: 'We must all respect the outcome of elections'
© Greg Nash

Maine Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Democratic clamor grows for select committee on Jan. 6 attack Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE, a leading Republican moderate who won a competitive race this week, on Friday urged both parties to “respect the outcome” of the election and defer to the state law on the counting of votes. 

“States have the authority to determine the specific rules of elections. Every valid vote under a state’s law should be counted. Allegations of irregularities can be adjudicated by the courts. We must all respect the outcome of elections,” Collins said. 

Collins won reelection to a fifth term this week with 51.1 percent of the vote, even though Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenExpanding child tax credit could lift 4 million children out of poverty: analysis Maria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' The Memo: The center strikes back MORE beat President TrumpDonald TrumpMaria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' The Memo: The center strikes back Republicans eye Nashville crack-up to gain House seat MORE by 10 percentage points in Maine. She so far is the only Republican incumbent to win reelection in a state carried by Biden. 

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Democrats defeated Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (R-Colo.) and appear to have ousted Sen. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyDemocrats facing tough reelections back bipartisan infrastructure deal McGuire unveils Arizona Senate campaign On The Trail: Arizona is microcosm of battle for the GOP MORE (R-Ariz.) in two other states where Biden won and is leading in the vote tally, respectively.

Collins’s statement followed similar remarks tweeted Friday morning by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Graham calls voting rights bill 'biggest power grab' in history The wild card that might save Democrats in the midterms MORE (R-Ky.), who urged respect for the process.

“Here’s how this must work in our great country: Every legal vote should be counted. Any illegally-submitted ballots must not. All sides must get to observe the process. And the courts are here to apply the laws & resolve disputes. That's how Americans' votes decide the result,” the GOP leader tweeted.

McConnell appeared to throw some support to Trump by warning that “illegally-submitted ballots” must not be counted but he stopped short of endorsing the president’s claims of widespread election fraud.

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle MORE (R-Utah), a frequent critic of the president, on Thursday urged patience with the process.

“Counting every vote is at the heart of democracy. That process is often long and, for those running, frustrating. The votes will be counted. If there are irregularities alleged, they will be investigated and ultimately resolved in the courts,” he said.

“Have faith in democracy, in our Constitution, and in the American people,” he said.