SPONSORED:

Rick Scott running to chair Senate GOP campaign arm

Rick Scott running to chair Senate GOP campaign arm
© Bonnie Cash

Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) is running to chair the Senate Republican campaign arm, a spokesperson for the senator confirmed to The Hill.  

Scott, who joined the Senate in 2019 after serving eight years as Florida's governor, is so far the only GOP senator known to be running for the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) chairmanship. 

Senate Republicans are poised to hold their leadership elections next week, though which party will control the chamber won't be clear until Jan. 5 when Georgia will hold two runoff elections. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Scott, who has deep pockets and ties throughout the party, has long been viewed as interested in helming the NRSC and is viewed as a potential 2024 presidential contender. 

A Washington Post interview in November 2018 noted that when asked about chairing the NRSC Scott "sounded open to it," while not ruling it in or out. Sen. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden's crisis agenda hits headwinds Bipartisan Senate gang to talk with Biden aide on coronavirus relief Senators vet Buttigieg to run Transportation Department MORE (R-Ind.) ultimately chaired the NRSC during the 2020 cycle. 

If Scott is elected to chair the Senate campaign arm — Senate leadership elections take place behind closed doors and then are publicly announced — he will oversee a map where at least 21 GOP seats will be up. If GOP Sen. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerLimbaugh falsely says Biden didn't win legitimately while reacting to inauguration Suburbs pose challenge for GOP in post-Trump era Democrats swear in three senators to gain majority MORE (R-Ga.) wins a runoff election in early July, that would give Republicans 22 seats to defend in November 2022. 

Democrats, by comparison, will only be defending 12 seats.  

Republicans are poised to hold between 50 to 52 Senate seats in January, depending on the outcome of the two Georgia runoffs. 

Republicans who will be up for reelection include Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenators spar over validity of Trump impeachment trial Trump impeachment trial to begin week of Feb. 8 Murkowski didn't vote for Trump, won't join Democrats MORE (Alaska), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden's crisis agenda hits headwinds Bipartisan Senate gang to talk with Biden aide on coronavirus relief The Hill's Morning Report - Biden takes office, calls for end to 'uncivil war' MORE (Ohio), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senators call for commission to investigate Capitol attack Wisconsin Democrats make ad buy calling on Johnson to resign Efforts to secure elections likely to gain ground in Democrat-controlled Congress MORE (Wis.) and Scott's fellow Floridian Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSunday shows - Biden agenda, Trump impeachment trial dominate Rubio: Trump impeachment trial is 'stupid' The Memo: Biden gambles that he can do it all MORE.  

Republicans will also be trying to hold onto seats in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyGovernment used Patriot Act to gather website visitor logs in 2019 Appeals court rules NSA's bulk phone data collection illegal Dunford withdraws from consideration to chair coronavirus oversight panel MORE (R-Pa.) announced last month that he would retire instead of seeking reelection and Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOn The Money: Biden extends eviction moratorium, student loan forbearance | Stocks hit record highs on Biden's first day as president | Justice Dept. closes insider trading case against Burr The Hill's Morning Report - President Biden, Vice President Harris begin work today Justice Dept. closes insider trading case against Burr without charges MORE (R-N.C.) has previously pledged to retire.