Controversial Trump nominee Judy Shelton to pass Senate next week

Controversial Trump nominee Judy Shelton to pass Senate next week
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Judy Shelton, President TrumpDonald TrumpMyPillow CEO to pull ads from Fox News Haaland, Native American leaders press for Indigenous land protections Simone Biles, Vince Lombardi and the courage to walk away MORE’s controversial nominee to the Federal Reserve, will receive a vote on the Senate floor next week and is expected to pass.

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiBill would honor Ginsburg, O'Connor with statues at Capitol The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - US gymnast wins all-around gold as Simone Biles cheers from the stands The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - A huge win for Biden, centrist senators MORE (R-Alaska), a key swing vote, announced Thursday that she had decided to support Shelton after speaking with her.

Her support appears enough to get Shelton through the Senate, where Republicans control 53 seats. Every Democrat is expected to vote against her.

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“I’ve had an opportunity to talk to Judy Shelton and I’m going to be supporting her,” Murkowski told reporters Thursday afternoon.

Moments later, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellAn August ultimatum: No recess until redistricting reform is done After police rip Trump for Jan. 6, McCarthy again blames Pelosi The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - US gymnast wins all-around gold as Simone Biles cheers from the stands MORE (R-Ky.) filed for cloture on Shelton’s nomination, setting up a vote in the middle of next week.

A Senate Republican who was briefed by the leadership said Shelton has enough votes to pass.

“She’s coming to the floor and I was told today that we have the votes,” said the lawmaker.

Shelton’s nomination appeared dead in the water when Republican leaders decided not to bring her up for a vote before the election. She ran into bipartisan opposition earlier this year over her past support for returning to the gold standard and using inflation as a tool to make U.S. exports more competitive.

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Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (R-Pa.), the incoming chairman of the Banking Committee, only agreed to vote for Shelton after she pledged in writing that she “would not advocate for the devaluation of U.S. currency” and agreed the Federal Reserve does not have authority to use monetary policy to devalue the dollar.

She also told Toomey in writing that it would not be appropriate for the Federal Reserve to react directly to the foreign exchange behavior of other countries.

Two other Republicans on the Banking Committee, Sens. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbySenate passes .1 billion Capitol security bill Democrats ramp up pressure for infrastructure deal amid time crunch Overnight Defense: Senators reach billion deal on emergency Capitol security bill | House panel looks to help military sexual assault survivors | US increases airstrikes to help Afghan forces fight Taliban MORE (R-Ala.) and John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.) expressed reluctance about voting for Shelton but eventually came around.

National Economic Council Director Larry KudlowLarry KudlowMORE was Shelton’s biggest champion, according to Senate aides familiar with her nomination.

Two Senate Republicans have announced their opposition to Shelton, Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTop Democrat: 'A lot of spin' coming from White House on infrastructure Bill would honor Ginsburg, O'Connor with statues at Capitol The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - US gymnast wins all-around gold as Simone Biles cheers from the stands MORE (Maine) and Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - US gymnast wins all-around gold as Simone Biles cheers from the stands The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - A huge win for Biden, centrist senators The 17 Republicans who voted to advance the Senate infrastructure bill MORE (Utah).

Romney said Thursday he still plans to vote against the nominee.

“I’m not supportive of her becoming a member of the Fed,” he said.

Collins in July said she had “serious concerns about the nomination.”

“In her past statements, Ms. Shelton has openly called for the Federal Reserve to be less independent of the political branches, and has even questioned the need for a central bank. This is not the right signal to send, particularly in the midst of the pandemic,” Collins said.