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Grassley tests positive for coronavirus

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyRep. Rick Allen tests positive for COVID-19 On The Money: Biden to nominate Yellen for Treasury secretary | 'COVID cliff' looms | Democrats face pressure to back smaller stimulus Loeffler to continue to self-isolate after conflicting COVID-19 test results MORE (R-Iowa) said Tuesday evening that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, hours after announcing that he would be quarantining after a potential exposure.

"This morning, I learned that I had been exposed to the coronavirus. I received a COVID-19 test and immediately began to quarantine. While I still feel fine, the test came back positive for the coronavirus," Grassley said in a statement.

Grassley, who is 87 and third in line to the presidency, added in a tweet that he was "feeling good" and would continue to comply with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

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The senator's statement revealing the positive test came less than a day after he disclosed that he was going to quarantine after being exposed to the virus.

Grassley was in the Senate on Monday. He helped open the chamber for the week and gave a brief speech from the Senate floor. Like most senators, Grassley was not wearing a mask while he gave his speech from his desk to a largely empty chamber.

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The Iowa Republican is the sixth senator to test positive for the coronavirus. 

GOP Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLoeffler isolating after possible COVID-19 infection Rick Scott tests positive for coronavirus Overnight Defense: Formal negotiations inch forward on defense bill with Confederate base name language | Senators look to block B UAE arms sales | Trump administration imposes Iran sanctions over human rights abuses MORE (Ky.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeLoeffler isolating after possible COVID-19 infection Rick Scott tests positive for coronavirus OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Barrasso to seek top spot on Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Forest Service finalizes rule weakening environmental review of its projects | Biden to enlist Agriculture, Transportation agencies in climate fight MORE (Utah), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonLoeffler isolating after possible COVID-19 infection Rick Scott tests positive for coronavirus GOP Rep. Dan Newhouse tests positive for COVID-19 MORE (Wis.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisNorth Carolina — still purple but up for grabs Team Trump offering 'fire hose' of conspiracy Kool-Aid for supporters Loeffler isolating after possible COVID-19 infection MORE (N.C.) and Bill CassidyBill CassidyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience Bottom line Loeffler isolating after possible COVID-19 infection MORE (La.) have all tested positive. Democratic Sens. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyScranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Grassley tests positive for coronavirus Casey says he isn't thinking about Pennsylvania gubernatorial bid in 2022 MORE (Pa.) and Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Rick Scott tests positive for coronavirus Grassley tests positive for coronavirus MORE (Va.) have both said they tested positive for coronavirus antibodies, an indication they were previously exposed to the virus.

Grassley’s decision to quarantine and his subsequent positive diagnosis will interrupt his roughly 27-year voting streak that includes 8,927 uninterrupted votes.

“I’m disappointed I wasn’t able to vote today in the Senate, but the health of others is more important than any record,” Grassley said in a statement earlier Tuesday before he got his positive test results.

Grassley, according to his office, holds the record for the length of time without missing a vote in the history of the Senate. He set that record in 2016 when he surpassed the record set by the late Wisconsin Sen. William Proxmire (D).

Grassley missed his last vote on July 20, 1993, due to flooding in Iowa.

Updated at 6:42 p.m.