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Sasse: Supreme Court 'closed the book' on election 'nonsense'

Sen. Ben SasseBen SasseIs nonpartisan effectiveness still possible? Senators introduce bill creating technology partnerships to compete with China Garland's AG nomination delayed by GOP roadblocks MORE (R-Neb.) said on Friday that the Supreme Court "closed the book on the nonsense" by rejecting a push led by Texas to overturn President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenCNN: Bidens' dogs removed from the White House Federal judge rules 'QAnon shaman' too dangerous to be released from jail Pelosi says Capitol riot was one of the most difficult moments of her career MORE's election win. 

"Since Election Night, a lot of people have been confusing voters by spinning Kenyan Birther-type, ‘Chavez rigged the election from the grave’ conspiracy theories, but every American who cares about the rule of law should take comfort that the Supreme Court — including all three of President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump vows 'No more money for RINOS,' instead encouraging donations to his PAC Federal judge rules 'QAnon shaman' too dangerous to be released from jail Pelosi says Capitol riot was one of the most difficult moments of her career MORE’s picks — closed the book on the nonsense," Sasse said in a statement. 

Sasse is one of the first congressional Republicans to react to the Supreme Court's decision. He's one of only a handful of Senate Republicans who have acknowledged Biden as the president-elect. 

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The Supreme Court on Friday night rejected a long-shot legal challenge led by Texas but backed by 17 other GOP state attorneys general and 126 House Republicans. 

The challenge sought to nullify Biden's wins in Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Georgia by rehashing claims of fraud that have been dismissed by other courts and disputed by election experts. 

The Supreme Court's order was unsigned, but Justices Clarence ThomasClarence ThomasChief Justice Roberts accuses court of turning judges into 'advice columnists' Vernon Jordan: an American legend, and a good friend Kavanaugh dismays conservatives by dodging pro-Trump election lawsuits MORE and Samuel AlitoSamuel AlitoJustices hear sparring over scope of safeguards for minority voters Kavanaugh dismays conservatives by dodging pro-Trump election lawsuits Laurence Tribe: Justice Thomas is out of order on 2020 election MORE wrote a dissenting statement expressing their view that the court is obligated to hear interstate disputes." They added that while they would have granted "the motion to file the bill of complaint," they "would not grant other relief." 

The Texas lawsuit had drawn pushback from other GOP senators, though they haven't yet weighed in after the Supreme Court's decision. 

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - Relief bill to become law; Cuomo in trouble GOP stumbles give Democrats new hope in Texas Senate holds longest vote in history as Democrats scramble to save relief bill MORE (R-Texas) told reporters, “I do not understand the legal theory."

Meanwhile, Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump vows 'No more money for RINOS,' instead encouraging donations to his PAC Trump ramps up battle with Republican leadership GOP senator defends Cheney, Murkowski after Trump rebuke MORE (R-Alaska) described herself as "really disappointed" in the House lawmakers supporting the effort and Sen. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderRoy Blunt won't run for Senate seat in 2022 Congress addressed surprise medical bills, but the issue is not resolved Trump renominates Judy Shelton in last-ditch bid to reshape Fed MORE (R-Tenn.), who is retiring, told NBC News that "I'm having a hard time figuring out the basis for" the lawsuit.