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GOP senator on Trump pardons: 'It is legal, it is constitutional, but I think it's a misuse of the power'

GOP Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (Pa.) said Sunday that President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump DOJ demanded metadata on 73 phone numbers and 36 email addresses, Apple says Putin says he's optimistic about working with Biden ahead of planned meeting Biden meets Queen Elizabeth for first time as president MORE's pardons for Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneFeds charge members of Three Percenters militia group over Jan. 6 attack Biden's anti-corruption memo is good news — and essential to US national security Legal intrigue swirls over ex-Trump exec Weisselberg: Five key points MORE, Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortLegal intrigue swirls over ex-Trump exec Weisselberg: Five key points There was Trump-Russia collusion — and Trump pardoned the colluder Treasury: Manafort associate passed 'sensitive' campaign data to Russian intelligence MORE and other loyalists convicted of various crimes were legal and constitutional but a "misuse" of power.

Speaking with "Fox News Sunday" guest anchor Mike Emanuel, Toomey said that he disagreed with Trump's use of the pardon "in some cases."

"I think the case of Mike Flynn, for instance, was completely legitimate to pardon him because the prosecution was an abuse of power. I don't think Michael Flynn ever committed a crime," Toomey said, referring to Trump's first national security adviser.

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"But some of these other cases — I mean, my goodness — we have tax fraud and bank fraud, witness tampering, obstruction of justice, but because they were close to the president, they got pardoned?" the senator continued, adding, "It is legal, it is constitutional, but I think it's a misuse of the power."

The president sparked heavy criticism when he issued pardons for Manafort and Stone as well as Trump-friendly former Reps. Duncan HunterDuncan HunterTrump denies Gaetz asked him for blanket pardon Gaetz, on the ropes, finds few friends in GOP Trust, transparency, and tithing is not enough to sustain democracy MORE (R-Calif.), Steve StockmanStephen (Steve) Ernest StockmanPardon talk intensifies as Trump approaches final 24 hours in office GOP senator on Trump pardons: 'It is legal, it is constitutional, but I think it's a misuse of the power' Nothing becomes Donald Trump's presidency like his leaving it MORE (R-Texas) and Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsTrump denies Gaetz asked him for blanket pardon Gaetz, on the ropes, finds few friends in GOP Schumer to recommend three Black lawyers to head US attorney offices in NY MORE (R-N.Y.).

Toomey was also asked on Sunday if he agreed with recent calls to reform presidential pardon power, which the senator said would be difficult to achieve.

"Some are suggesting it's time to reform presidential powers. Do you agree?" asked Emanuel.

"You know, it's a good discussion to have, but it's a tough call," the Pennsylvania Republican responded. "This is obviously a constitutional power, so I don't know how we would do it without amending the Constitution, and I think ... it would be very challenging."

Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to investigators about his contacts with Russia in 2017. Manafort, Trump's former campaign chairman, was convicted of eight felonies in 2018, including tax and bank fraud. Stone, an informal adviser to the 2016 Trump campaign, was convicted of seven felonies in 2019, including witness tampering. The president pardoned Stone and Manafort as well as his son-in-law Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerThe Israel-Hamas ceasefire is holding — what's next? Eric Trump buys .2M home near father's golf club in Florida CDC's about-face on masks appears politically motivated to help a struggling Biden MORE's father, Charles Kushner, last Thursday, while Flynn was pardoned in November.

Trump is reportedly considering preemptive pardons for his adult children and himself amid calls from Democrats for investigations after he leaves office.