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GOP Georgia senators throw support behind $2,000 stimulus checks

Sens. David PerdueDavid PerdueAdvocates warn restrictive voting bills could end Georgia's record turnout Georgia Gov. Kemp says he'd 'absolutely' back Trump as 2024 nominee Bipartisan bill would ban lawmakers from buying, selling stocks MORE (R-Ga.) and Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerAdvocates warn restrictive voting bills could end Georgia's record turnout Georgia Gov. Kemp says he'd 'absolutely' back Trump as 2024 nominee Bipartisan bill would ban lawmakers from buying, selling stocks MORE (R-Ga.) on Tuesday threw their support behind a President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden to sign executive order aimed at increasing voting access Albany Times Union editorial board calls for Cuomo's resignation Advocates warn restrictive voting bills could end Georgia's record turnout MORE-backed effort to increase the amount of recently passed stimulus checks from $600 to $2,000.

The endorsement from the two senators — who are sticking closely with President Trump as they fight for their political lives in next week's Georgia runoff elections — comes after the legislation passed the House on Monday in a 275-134 vote.

"I'm delighted to support the president in this $2,000. ... So I fully support what the president is doing right now," Perdue said during an interview with Fox News on Tuesday.

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Perdue, who is in a tight race with Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff in his bid for a second term, added in a tweet that "President @realDonaldTrump is right."

Loeffler, who was appointed to the Senate and faces her own tight runoff battle against Democratic candidate the Rev. Raphael Warnock, echoed the senior Georgia senator, tweeting "I agree" with Trump. She added in a separate Fox News interview that she supports the push to increase the amount of the direct payment from $600 to $2,000.

"The president has fought for our country from day one. He continues to fight for every single American. I've stood by the president 100 percent of the time. I'm proud to do that and I've said absolutely, we need to get relief to Americans now, and I will support that," Loeffler said.  

In addition to Perdue and Loeffler, GOP Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSunday shows preview: Manchin makes the rounds after pivotal role in coronavirus relief debate Georgia DA investigating Trump taps racketeering expert for probe: report GOP votes in unison against COVID-19 relief bill MORE (S.C.), Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyDeSantis, Pence tied in 2024 Republican poll Chamber of Commerce clarifies stance on lawmakers who voted against election certification Crenshaw pours cold water on 2024 White House bid: 'Something will emerge' MORE (Mo.) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioGOP votes in unison against COVID-19 relief bill Hillicon Valley: YouTube to restore Trump's account | House-passed election bill takes aim at foreign interference | Senators introduce legislation to create international tech partnerships Senators introduce bill creating technology partnerships to compete with China MORE (Fla.) have backed raising the amount of the stimulus checks. Under the $2.3 trillion deal signed into law on Sunday night, Americans who make up to $75,000 will get a $600 check, with the amount of the direct payment scaling down for higher incomes.

Trump, in his statement, claimed that the "Senate will start the process for a vote that increases checks to $2,000, repeals Section 230, and starts an investigation into voter fraud."

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Democrats are also trying to build pressure on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden takes victory lap after Senate passes coronavirus relief package GOP votes in unison against COVID-19 relief bill Senate approves sweeping coronavirus measure in partisan vote MORE (R-Ky.) to give the House-passed checks proposal a vote, warning that they will slow-walk the effort to override Trump's veto of an unrelated defense policy bill. 

McConnell has made no comments yet about if he will give the House bill a vote, or if he'll bring a proposal to increase the amount of direct assistance to the floor at all. Tying it to a full repeal of Section 230, a legal shield for tech companies, and election-related issues would likely crater Democratic support for any bill.

If McConnell gave it a stand-alone vote, Democrats would need the support of at least 12 Republicans if all 48 members of their caucus voted to increase the amount of direct assistance.

The runoff in Georgia will determine which party controls the upper chamber. Democrats need to win both seats in order to split the chamber 50-50 and gain the advantage when Vice President-elect Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisBiden takes victory lap after Senate passes coronavirus relief package It will be Vice (or) President Harris against Gov. DeSantis in 2024 — bet on it Trump sued by Democrat over mob attack on Capitol MORE is sworn in and becomes the tie-breaking vote.