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Bipartisan group of senators: The election is over

A bipartisan group of senators on Sunday urged their colleagues to support the Electoral College vote, as at least a dozen GOP senators prepare to challenge the election results on Wednesday. 

GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsRomney: Capitol riot was 'an insurrection against the Constitution' Former OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Masks off: CDC greenlights return to normal for vaccinated Americans MORE (Maine), Bill CassidyBill CassidyRomney: Capitol riot was 'an insurrection against the Constitution' Utah county GOP censures Romney over Trump impeachment vote Amazon blocks 10B listings in crackdown on counterfeits MORE (La.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRomney: Capitol riot was 'an insurrection against the Constitution' Senate panel deadlocks over Biden pick to lead DOJ civil rights division Senate GOP dismayed by vote to boot Cheney MORE (Alaska) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyRomney: Capitol riot was 'an insurrection against the Constitution' Immigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart Top border officials defend Biden policies MORE (Utah) and Democratic Sens. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinFormer OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Masks off: CDC greenlights return to normal for vaccinated Americans Jill Biden, Jennifer Garner go mask-free on vaccine-promoting West Virginia trip MORE (W.Va.), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerBiden signs executive order to improve federal cybersecurity Overnight Defense: Former Pentagon chief to testify about Capitol riot Wednesday | Senate Intelligence chairman wants Biden to review US Space Command move Wyden: Funding infrastructure with gas tax hike a 'big mistake' MORE (Va.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenArmy secretary nominee concerned about 'unreasonable or unhelpful demands' on National Guard DC statehood bill picks up Senate holdout US is leaving, but Afghan women to fight on for freedoms MORE (N.H.), Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanDC statehood bill picks up Senate holdout Overnight Health Care: Biden announces 1M have enrolled in special ObamaCare sign-up period | Rand Paul clashes with Fauci over coronavirus origins | Biden vows to get 'more aggressive' on lifestyle benefits of vaccines Biden health official says COVID-19 vaccine booster shots will be free MORE (N.H.), Dick DurbinDick DurbinSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Sweeping election reform bill faces Senate buzz saw Police reform talks hit familiar stumbling block MORE (Ill.) and Independent Sen. Angus KingAngus KingDC statehood bill picks up Senate holdout Senate panel deadlocks in vote on sweeping elections bill Senate descends into hours-long fight over elections bill MORE (I-Maine) said in a joint statement that the “election is over.”

“At this point, further attempts to cast doubt on the legitimacy of the 2020 Presidential election are contrary to the clearly expressed will of the American people and only serve to undermine Americans’ confidence in the already determined election results,” they said. 

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“The voters have spoken, and Congress must now fulfill its responsibility to certify the election results. .... It is time to move forward,” they added. 

The joint statement comes a day after 11 GOP senators, led by Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzFormer OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden Seth Rogen says he's not in a feud with 'fascist' Ted Cruz, whose 'words caused people to die' GOP votes to replace Cheney with Stefanik after backing from Trump MORE (R-Texas), said they would support challenges to the Electoral College results on Wednesday, when Congress convenes a joint session to formally count the vote. 

Combined with Sen. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyNYPD Asian Hate Crimes Task Force chief: Attacks are 'not new' More than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan MORE (R-Mo.), who had already said he plans to object, that means at least 12 GOP senators will support attempts to overturn President-Elect Joe BidenJoe BidenWarren calls for US to support ceasefire between Israel and Hamas UN secretary general 'deeply disturbed' by Israeli strike on high rise that housed media outlets Nation's largest nurses union condemns new CDC guidance on masks MORE’s win, after he received 306 Electoral College votes to President TrumpDonald TrumpSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Navajo Nation president on Arizona's new voting restrictions: An 'assault' on our rights The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez MORE’s 232. 

Trump, who has endorsed challenges to the election results in Congress, has claimed that the election was "rigged" or that there was widespread voter fraud. And the 11 GOP senators, in their joint statement on Saturday, alleged that the 2020 election included "unprecedented allegations of voter fraud."

Dozens of attempts by Trump's legal team to challenge the results in key states have been dismissed by the courts and election experts have repeatedly rejected claims of widespread voter fraud. Then-Attorney General William BarrBill BarrSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Lawyer for former officer charged in George Floyd death alleges witness coercion CNN legal analyst joins DOJ's national security division MORE also said last month that his department had found no widespread voter fraud that could change the outcome of the election. 

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But if a member of the House and a member of the Senate support an objection, the two bodies pause the counting of the Electoral College vote, go to their respective chambers and debate the issue for up to two hours. In order for an objection to be successful, something that has never happened before, it would need the support of a majority of both the House and Senate.

The Jan. 6 effort is guaranteed to fall short even in the GOP-controlled Senate, where several members have said they will not support efforts to challenge the election results. 

“I think the overwhelming weight of the evidence is that Joe Biden defeated my candidate Donald Trump and I have to live with it,” Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerBiden says he and GOP both 'sincere about' seeking infrastructure compromise The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden expresses optimism on bipartisanship; Cheney ousted Hillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech MORE (R-Miss.) said on Sunday. 

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyBiden officials testify that white supremacists are greatest domestic security threat Republicans embrace Trump in effort to reclaim Senate Top Senate Democrat announces return of earmarks MORE (R-Ala.), asked about the plan by Sen. Tommy Tuberville (R-Ala.) to object, said that “it’s time to move on.”