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Senate swears-in six new lawmakers as 117th Congress convenes

Senate swears-in six new lawmakers as 117th Congress convenes
© Greg Nash

Six new senators were sworn in Sunday as part of the 117th Congress.

New members of the chamber included: Sen. Tommy Tuberville (R-Ala.), who defeated Sen. Doug Jones (D); Sen. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperLobbying world DNC taps veteran campaign hands for communications staff Harris casts tiebreaking vote to advance Biden nominee MORE (D-Colo.), who defeated Sen. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (R); Sen. Roger MarshallRoger W. MarshallSasse to introduce legislation giving new hires signing bonuses after negative jobs report Bad jobs report amplifies GOP cries to end 0 benefits boost Fauci vs. Rogan: White House works to stomp out misinformation MORE (R-Kan.), who succeeded Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsSenate GOP faces retirement brain drain Roy Blunt won't run for Senate seat in 2022 Lobbying world MORE (R); Sen. Ben Ray LujanBen Ray LujanSenate Democrats push Biden over raising refugee cap Democrats push Twitter, Facebook to remove vaccine 'disinformation dozen' GOP looks to squeeze Biden, Democrats on border MORE (D-N.M.), who succeeded Sen. Tom UdallTom UdallStudy: Chemical used in paint thinners caused more deaths than EPA identified Oregon senator takes center stage in Democratic filibuster debate Bipartisan bill seeks to raise fees for public lands drilling MORE (D); Sen. Bill Hagerty (R-Tenn.), who succeeded Sen. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderThe Republicans' deep dive into nativism Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality MORE (R); and Sen. Cynthia LummisCynthia Marie LummisTrump muddles Republican messaging on Afghanistan GOP frustration with Liz Cheney 'at a boiling point' Senate passes bipartisan B water infrastructure bill MORE (R-Wyo.), who succeeded Sen. Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziThe unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality Lummis adopts 'laser eyes' meme touting Bitcoin MORE (R).

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California Secretary of State Alex Padilla (D), who Gov. Gavin NewsomGavin NewsomCalifornia drought emergency expanded to most of the state Caitlyn Jenner says election was not 'stolen,' calls Biden 'our president' California scores staggering B budget surplus MORE (D) named as Vice President-elect Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisOde to Mother's Day Warren says she'll run for reelection to Senate In honor of Mother's Day, lawmakers should pass the Momnibus Act MORE’ replacement, is set to assume the seat after Harris resigns following the Jan. 20 inauguration.

"To say the 117th Congress convenes at a challenging time would indeed be an understatement," Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellManchin, Biden huddle amid talk of breaking up T package Romney: Removing Cheney from House leadership will cost GOP election votes The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden reverses Trump limits on transgender protections MORE (R-Ky.) said in a statement after senators were sworn in. "From political division to a deadly pandemic to adversaries around the world, the hurdles before us are many and they are serious."

"But there's also plenty of reason for hope," McConnell continued. "An optimistic forward-looking ... spirit has been one of our country's most distinctive calling cards since our very earliest days. And with safe and effective vaccines rolling out across our nation every day, I'd say 2021 looks bright already."

The chamber’s balance of power will not become clear until after Tuesday’s Senate runoffs in Georgia, where Sens. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerGeorgia Republican secretary of state hits Loeffler as 'weak,' 'fake Trumper' Loeffler asks Georgia attorney general to investigate Raffensperger over 2020 election Former Rep. Doug Collins won't enter Georgia Senate race MORE (R) and David PerdueDavid PerdueGeorgia Republican secretary of state hits Loeffler as 'weak,' 'fake Trumper' Warnock raises nearly M since January victory Georgia's top election official looks to shake political drama MORE (R) will defend their seats against the Rev. Raphael Warnock (D) and Jon Ossoff (D), respectively.

A Democratic victory in both seats would result in a 50-50 split in the chamber, with tie votes broken by Harris.