SPONSORED:

Democrats win control of Senate after Warnock, Ossoff victories

Democrats have won control of the Senate after securing victories in two runoff races in Georgia, a historic shift that will effectively give the party full control of the government under President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden to meet with 6 GOP senators next week Arizona secretary of state gets security detail over death threats surrounding election audit On The Money: Five takeaways on a surprisingly poor jobs report | GOP targets jobless aid after lackluster April gain MORE.

Democrat Raphael WarnockRaphael WarnockDemocrats cool on Crist's latest bid for Florida governor Alabama museum unveils restored Greyhound bus for Freedom Rides' 60th anniversary The Hill's Morning Report - Biden launches blitz for jobs plan with 'thank you, Georgia' MORE defeated Sen. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerGeorgia Republican secretary of state hits Loeffler as 'weak,' 'fake Trumper' Loeffler asks Georgia attorney general to investigate Raffensperger over 2020 election Former Rep. Doug Collins won't enter Georgia Senate race MORE (R-Ga.), while Democrat Jon OssoffJon OssoffThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden launches blitz for jobs plan with 'thank you, Georgia' Biden marks 100th day plugging jobs plan in Georgia Georgia Republican secretary of state hits Loeffler as 'weak,' 'fake Trumper' MORE defeated Sen. David PerdueDavid PerdueGeorgia Republican secretary of state hits Loeffler as 'weak,' 'fake Trumper' Warnock raises nearly M since January victory Georgia's top election official looks to shake political drama MORE, in hotly contested runoff races, giving each party 50 seats in the Senate. Vice President-elect Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHarris says Mexico, US can work together to improve quality of life in Northern Triangle Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms says 'it is time to pass the baton on to someone else' Harris's uncle discusses COVID-19 surge in India: 'The conditions are pretty bad' MORE will cast the tie-breaking votes, giving Democrats control of the Senate for the first time since 2014.

Warnock’s victory over Loeffler was called early Wednesday morning. The race between Ossoff and Perdue was closer and was not called until the afternoon, as police clashed with a right-wing mob that stormed Capitol Hill to disrupt the Electoral College vote count.

ADVERTISEMENT

Hours earlier, President TrumpDonald TrumpDemocrats, activists blast reported Trump DOJ effort to get journalists' phone records Arizona secretary of state gets security detail over death threats surrounding election audit Trump admin got phone records of WaPo reporters covering Russia probe: report MORE addressed tens of thousands of his supporters to claim that the November election and the Georgia Senate races had been stolen by Democrats through widespread fraud.

The Trump campaign lost more than 50 court cases centered around the president's allegations of fraud and the election results have been certified in all 50 states.

Trump campaigned for Perdue and Loeffler in the days before the election, but GOP turnout was down in rural Republican strongholds. Black voters turned out for Democrats in record numbers, while the GOP’s weakness in the Atlanta suburbs may have cost them in the traditionally red state.

Once the vote count is certified, Sen. Charles SchumerChuck SchumerBiden to meet with 6 GOP senators next week The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Upbeat jobs data, relaxed COVID-19 restrictions offer rosier US picture How to fast-track climate action? EPA cutting super pollutant HFCs MORE (D-N.Y.) is expected to become the next Senate majority leader, ousting current Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden to meet with 6 GOP senators next week GOP is consumed by Trump conspiracy theories The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Upbeat jobs data, relaxed COVID-19 restrictions offer rosier US picture MORE (R-Ky.).

McConnell on Wednesday issued a blistering rebuke of the Republicans who had joined an effort to challenge the Electoral College vote.

ADVERTISEMENT

Schumer is expected to work closely with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiBiden to meet with 6 GOP senators next week Five takeaways on a surprisingly poor jobs report On The Money: Weekly jobless claims fall to 498K, hitting new post-lockdown low | House to advance appropriations bills in June, July MORE (D-Calif.), his longtime ally in the House.

Democrats last controlled the House, Senate and White House when President Obama was first elected in 2008.

The victories by Biden, Warnock and Ossoff in Georgia this cycle represent a seismic shift in electoral politics.

Biden defeated Trump in Georgia by about 11,000 votes, making Trump the first GOP presidential candidate to lose Georgia since 1992. That was also the last time Democrats had two elected senators in the state.

Warnock, the senior pastor at the Historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Martin Luther King, Jr. once preached, follows Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottUpdating the aging infrastructure in Historically Black Colleges and Universities McConnell amid Trump criticism: 'I'm looking forward, not backward' The instructive popularity of Biden's 'New Deal' for the middle class MORE (R-S.C.) to become the second Black senator to represent a Southern state since Reconstruction.

ADVERTISEMENT

Ossoff will become the first Jewish senator from Georgia.

Republicans only needed to win one of the two Georgia runoffs to maintain a slim majority in the Senate..

Many Republicans believe Trump’s sustained attacks against GOP officials in the state and his persistent claims that the election had been stolen from him played a major role in the upset losses.

The president is also being blamed by Republicans for the riots on Capitol Hill, which came directly after he incited his crowd of supporters to demand Congress overturn the outcome of the election.