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Hawley to still object to Pennsylvania after Capitol breached

Sen. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyFive big takeaways on the Capitol security hearings Sanders votes against Biden USDA nominee Vilsack Senate confirms Vilsack as Agriculture secretary MORE (R-Mo.) is going forward with his plan to object to Pennsylvania's Electoral College results, even as many of the 14 GOP senators who had supported challenging the election results are backing down. 

Hawley's plan guarantees that the Senate will have to vote on objections to at least two states, with the chamber currently debating a separate objection to Arizona's results. 

"Senator Hawley spoke during the debate on the Arizona objection, but he will object to Pennsylvania once Congress returns to the joint session, and when the Senate and House go back to their chambers for the debate on Pennsylvania, he will yield his speaking time to move toward a vote," said Kelli Ford, a spokesperson for Hawley. 

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Even if Hawley yields his time, other senators will still be able to fill the two hours designated for the debate. The House would also have its own two-hour debate.

Republicans had hoped that they had convinced their colleagues to drop their objections to Georgia and Pennsylvania after the proceedings were suspended for hours after rioters stormed the Capitol and breached both the House and Senate chambers. 

Hawley spoke briefly from the Senate floor about Pennsylvania but didn't directly say whether or not he was sticking by his plan to object.  

"What we are doing here tonight is actually very important because for those who have concerns about the integrity of our elections, those who have concerns about what happened in November, this is the appropriate means, this is the lawful place where those objections and concerns should be heard," Hawley said from the Senate floor. 

Hawley was one of at least 14 GOP senators who had planned to support efforts to overturn the election results in key states. 

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But several of those senators have dropped their plans after rioters stormed the Capitol on Wednesday.  

"The events that transpired have forced me to reconsider and I cannot now in good conscience object to certification of these electors. The violence, the lawlessness and siege of the halls of Congress are abhorrent and stand as a direct attack on what my objection was intended to protect, the sanctity of the American democratic process," Sen. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerGeorgia's GOP-led Senate passes bill requiring ID for absentee voting Lawmakers commemorate one-year anniversary of Arbery's killing Perdue rules out 2022 Senate bid against Warnock MORE (R-Ga.) said from the Senate floor. 

Loeffler had been expected to object to the election results from Georgia, a day after losing her bid for the final two years of retired Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonLoeffler leaves door open to 2022 rematch against Warnock Perdue on potential 2022 run: GOP must regain the Senate Bottom line MORE's term.  

Sens. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordOvernight Health Care: US surpasses half a million COVID deaths | House panel advances Biden's .9T COVID-19 aid bill | Johnson & Johnson ready to provide doses for 20M Americans by end of March 11 GOP senators slam Biden pick for health secretary: 'No meaningful experience' Missouri newspaper hammers Hawley and Blunt: 'Embarrassment to the state' MORE (R-Okla.) and Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesPowell pushes back on GOP inflation fears Udalls: Haaland criticism motivated 'by something other than her record' Haaland faces contentious confirmation fight  MORE (R-Mont.), who had both signed on to a letter from Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Defense: Law enforcement officials blame Pentagon 'reluctance' to deploy National Guard in first hearing on Capitol attack | Watchdog report finds Pentagon didn't fully evaluate border deployment requests | Biden's UN ambassador confirmed Top cops deflect blame over Capitol attack Sanders votes against Biden USDA nominee Vilsack MORE (R-Texas) supporting challenging the results unless a commission was formed to provide a 10-day audit, also backed down on Wednesday night. 

"We must, and we will, have a peaceful and orderly transition of power. The violent actions of these rioters severely damages efforts to restore confidence in our elections. We will continue our calls to examine election integrity through all legal and peaceful means," they said in a joint statement. 

“We now need the entire Congress to come together and vote to certify the election results. We must stand together as Americans. We must defend our Constitution and the rule of law," they added.