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Bipartisan Senate gang to talk with Biden aide on coronavirus relief

Bipartisan Senate gang to talk with Biden aide on coronavirus relief
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A bipartisan group of 16 senators is expected to speak this weekend with a White House aide about coronavirus relief.

The phone call with National Economic Council Director Brian DeeseBrian DeeseThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden's infrastructure plan triggers definition debate Battle lines drawn on Biden's infrastructure plan Sunday shows - Infrastructure in the spotlight MORE, confirmed by a source familiar with the plan, is expected to be used to discuss President Biden's roughly $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief proposal.

Spokespeople for the White House didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

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The Senate group includes many of the same members as last year's "908" coalition, who created a framework credited by leadership as breaking a months-long stalemate on a fifth round of coronavirus help.

The GOP senators in the group are Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Biden-GOP infrastructure talks off to rocky start Moderate GOP senators and Biden clash at start of infrastructure debate MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump looms large over GOP donor retreat in Florida Top GOP super PAC endorses Murkowski amid primary threat Biden-GOP infrastructure talks off to rocky start MORE (Alaska), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTwo sheriff's deputies shot by gunman in Utah Romney blasts end of filibuster, expansion of SCOTUS On management of Utah public lands, Biden should pursue an accountable legislative process MORE (Utah), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanTo encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision The Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Biden-GOP infrastructure talks off to rocky start MORE (Ohio), Bill CassidyBill CassidyCalls grow for national paid family leave amid pandemic Senators urge Energy chief to prioritize cybersecurity amid growing threats Vivek Murthy confirmed as surgeon general MORE (La.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoBiden-GOP infrastructure talks off to rocky start Moderate GOP senators and Biden clash at start of infrastructure debate America's infrastructure: You get what you pay for MORE (W.Va.), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranBipartisan lawmakers call for action on anti-hate crime measures Republicans don't think Biden really wants to work with them Trump allies line up ahead of potentially bruising primaries MORE (Kan.) and Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungTo encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision Senate Republicans voice opposition to Biden on Iran Biden infrastructure proposal prioritizes funds for emerging technologies MORE (Ind.).

The Democrats are Sens. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinClose the avenues of foreign meddling Democrats see political winner in tax fight MSNBC's Joy Reid pans Manchin, Sinema as the 'no progress caucus' MORE (W.Va.), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerA bold fix for US international taxation of corporations Democrats offer competing tax ideas on Biden infrastructure Five ways an obscure Senate ruling could change Washington MORE (Va.), Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanTo encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists POW/MIA flag moved back atop White House MORE (N.H.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenLawmakers express horror at latest Capitol attack Five things to watch on Biden infrastructure plan Democrats wrestle over tax hikes for infrastructure MORE (N.H.), Mark KellyMark KellyThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden assails 'epidemic' of gun violence amid SC, Texas shootings Democrats see opportunity as states push new voting rules Democratic county official joins race for Pennsylvania Senate seat MORE (Ariz.), John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperOn The Trail: How marijuana went mainstream Senators press for answers in Space Command move decision Senate rejects Cruz effort to block stimulus checks for undocumented immigrants MORE (Colo.), Dick DurbinDick DurbinLawmakers say fixing border crisis is Biden's job Number of migrants detained at southern border reaches 15-year high: reports Grassley, Cornyn push for Senate border hearing MORE (Ill.) and Independent Sen. Angus KingAngus KingGroups petition EPA to remove ethane and methane from list of compounds exempt from emissions limits Lack of cyber funds in Biden infrastructure plan raises eyebrows Five things to watch on Biden infrastructure plan MORE (Maine), who caucuses with Democrats.

The bipartisan meeting to discuss the specifics of Biden's proposal comes as it's already hitting fierce GOP pushback.

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntSunday shows preview: Democrats eye two-part infrastructure push; Michigan coronavirus cases surge DC delegate pushes for removing Capitol fence despite car attack Coons says bipartisan infrastructure package 'likely' to be smaller, not fully financed MORE (Mo.), a member of GOP leadership, called it a "non-starter," though he noted that pieces of Biden's offer could gain bipartisan support.

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Even GOP members of the group indicated that they weren't yet supportive of a new proposal but that they wanted to get details from the Biden White House on how the previous coronavirus funds are being dispersed.

"You know, there would be a lot of places where we agree. I think there'd be a lot of places where we disagree. We just passed a program with over $900 billion in it. I'm not looking for a new program in the immediate future," Romney told reporters this week.

Part of Biden's plan would provide a $1,400 direct payment for individuals who make up to $75,000, after bipartisan calls to increase the $600 payment included in last year's bill to $2,000. It would also provide payments for adult dependents, instead of just minors.

Durbin said the group isn't trying to come up with its own proposal, but that they've discussed the individual relief proposals.

"There's been a concern about the cash payment and whether or not there ought to be a different criteria for passing it out and distributing it. That has been discussed at length and I think it's one of the major elements," Durbin said.